Dan Hinmon, MCSMN Director
@DanHinmon

Posts: 2692
Joined: Apr 13, 2011

RIP SlideShare, It Was Good While It Lasted

Posted by @DanHinmon, Mon, Sep 10 11:48am

The lights may be on, but nobody’s home.

That’s how author Matthew Sweezey describes SlideShare’s dramatic slide in page visits and added content over the past few years.

He takes us through a quick history of the platform and explains what went wrong – with no hope for a fix. He also includes some alternatives to SlideShare – none of them very exciting.

Do you use SlideShare to host your organization’s presentations? What have you noticed re: visits, downloads, and engagement?

 

COMMENT

Great article. I have been looking into Prezi for our presentation needs. Anyone have any history or knowledge on that platform?

@bettinahalvorson I've used Prezi in the past, but I just never really took to it. And honestly apart from the initial excitement over a new slide platform, I can count on the fingers of one hand the amount of time I've seen it used at conferences and events

@DanHinmon while I take on board the points raised in the article, it's far from dead for my marketing. I still a lot of traction with SlideShare – far more views than I ever get on my blog. I always make a point of posting my slide on the site every time I give a talk and I can gauge the level of interest in terms of downloads and shares from the free analytics. And because it's owned by LinkedIn, it's really easy to upload slides to your LinkedIn profile and embed decks in LinkedIn articles and blog posts, It's also a super place to do research. I've always appreciated viewing @LeeAase slides on the site and I'd be interested in his opinion on this article too.

Very good points, @MarieEnnisOConnor. Seems like reports of its pending doom may be exaggerated. @LeeAase is an active user, as you said. How do you use the platform for research?

I use it to see what other experts in the industry are sharing – @LeeAase being a good case in point

Great points, @MarieEnnisOConnor! I like being able to use it when I speak externally, as an alternative to providing slides in advance. Because I have a relatively fast-paced cadence of slides, it's nice to be able to assure the audience members that they can just watch and engage and dispense with excessive note-taking. And being able to embed slide decks on my blog is really helpful, too. I definitely see it as one important tool that still has a lot of usefulness.

@LeeAase

Great points, @MarieEnnisOConnor! I like being able to use it when I speak externally, as an alternative to providing slides in advance. Because I have a relatively fast-paced cadence of slides, it's nice to be able to assure the audience members that they can just watch and engage and dispense with excessive note-taking. And being able to embed slide decks on my blog is really helpful, too. I definitely see it as one important tool that still has a lot of usefulness.

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I'm relieved to hear you haven't counted SlideShare out either @LeeAase 🙂

I am curious if companies like Amazon are changing the discussion about slides in general.

For example, at Amazon, the culture is now against slide presentations. Rather, a narrative is read by everyone at the beginning of a meeting and then it is discussed. (Kind of like time out for kids!) Also, I believe Steve Balmer did something similar at Microsoft…

One of the leading data graphics people in the country ( Edward Tufte ) advocates for this minimal slide approach – especially no bullet points and never, ever, ever a pie chart! – , and in fact runs his full day conferences with no powerpoint slides but instead a handout.

@matthewrehrl I'm in favor of this minimal approach. I still use slides in my presentation but I use them as visual props. In the same way that I like to make my written posts highly visual, I do the same with my presentations They mostly contain images with perhaps one sentence to reinforce the point. It also makes the talk more tweetable – I'm always gratified to see the audience taking pics of my slides to share on Twitter.

To continue the kids' analogy, I'm big on Show and Tell. My slides typically have a headline and an image. Slides with bullets are in the distinct minority. Often we use screen shots of our various communities and blogs to show the look and feel.

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