Longitudinal relationship between social media activity and article citations in the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Posted by @audreylaine, Tue, Aug 6 12:09pm

No, this isn’t your typical NYCU post, but I KNOW you can use this in your job. In fact, I’m bookmarking it so I can send it to physicians who think social media is a waste of time.

A group from Case Western conducted a study to evaluate the association between social media exposure and citations for articles published in the journal Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

“We found that social media exposure was associated with higher citations of journal articles over time. The strongest association was observed in articles that were discussed and mentioned on Twitter.”

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Although not causal, it does seems to be low hanging fruit that physician researchers should have a social media strategy in place in parallel to their publication efforts.

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@matthewrehrl

Although not causal, it does seems to be low hanging fruit that physician researchers should have a social media strategy in place in parallel to their publication efforts.

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I was meeting with a researcher just a few hours ago who doesn't want his name on his Twitter account (established in March 2019) because he's sharing the work of his lab and not himself specifically. We went around… and around… and around. My argument is that he is managing his online reputation as a PI and *therefore* the reputation of his lab.

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