Discussions

Using Content Creation as a Strategy

Posted by Lynda Mitchell @lyndagmitchell, Tue, Jul 7 6:21am

I'm now working for a nonprofit disease advocacy org. My current priority is a revised social media strategy to integrate/build upon the revised SEO strategy I implemented with the new website launch in May that's working well.

Currently the team posts high-quality information on social, but most of it is curated content that is not driving traffic to the org's website. They are also posting on social 3-5 times a day which seems like too much to me. I am wondering if anyone has implemented a content curation strategy that integrates well with a website and doesn't result in such frequent posting schedule on social media. Has anyone tried something like a weekly wrap up of curated content shared on social media that is posted as a blog on a website? Any other ideas?

Interesting discussion. I an Executive Director for a rare disease non-profit and what I do is post new content on our FB. Grp after I have placed the article on our website. Thus drawing folks hopefully to our website

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I think you are on the right track with focusing on the "integration" of the website with social media.

For example, although Mayo Clinic has an exceptional social media platform, I would suggest the cornerstone of it is their website's disease information dictionary, which nearly always gives them a place to link back to. Incidentally, the Mayo's disease dictionary is located on their home page, and (i apologize if I am misquoting or misparaphrasing @LeeAase ) I believe Lee mentioned to me once that they are very conservative regarding website changes because the volume of visits to this dictionary is so important (keeping in mind why people are visiting a disease page on the Mayo site).

Instead of a blog, could you create a focused "dictionary" on your site with deep information specific to your disease? Although it could be a large inital one time effort, it could pay back for years to come, both from an SEO perspective and as a destination for social media content for years to come?

Liked by Lee Aase

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Thank you both for your replies!

@hagm04 Hi Linda – I think it's a volume issue that I'm navigating. I'd be inclined to post on our blog and then promote on social. But that would add an additional workload of 12-15 blog posts a week. Therein lies my dilemma – do I reduce volume of posts on social so I can have the capacity to do more blog posts that are shared on social? Or is there another possible solution I haven't figured out?

@matthewrehrl the new website is all deep content now along the lines of what you are describing. It's set up for SEO with a pillar/cluster format; all pages are formatted for voice search with keywords, title tags and metadata. In a little over 6 weeks we have gone from about 5,000 keywords indexed in Google to over 20,000, so I know we are on the right track with the website's evergreen content. (It has been a fun project to work on and see positive results so quickly!)

What I'm still figuring out is the news/breaking news and how to integrate that best with the website. What is the sweet spot for the website and how do I best integrate it? Cut the volume to one post a day that is shared on social for example, like Linda is doing? Right now the news is largely just being posted to social and not on the website's blog, and most of those posts on social are going to 3rd party sites and not to our own website. Some thoughts that go through my mind: is this too much posting that is ultimately not helping our visibility? Do our followers even want this much news, anyway? I have a constituent survey in the works so I may get some insights there.

Thanks again!

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Thanks, @matthewrehrl – You're right that having such a great content resource in mayoclinic.org is extremely helpful because it enables us to link to trustworthy information. I think a blog incorporated within your website could be a good SEO strategy, especially if you use good search-friendly headlines. I continue to be amazed at how a post I wrote on my personal blog 10 years ago still generates over 100 page views per month. I think the bottom line is you need to have a content repository of some kind that is your home base, and you can use social media posts linking to that content to drive traffic and eventually also search volume.

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@LeeAase

Thanks, @matthewrehrl – You're right that having such a great content resource in mayoclinic.org is extremely helpful because it enables us to link to trustworthy information. I think a blog incorporated within your website could be a good SEO strategy, especially if you use good search-friendly headlines. I continue to be amazed at how a post I wrote on my personal blog 10 years ago still generates over 100 page views per month. I think the bottom line is you need to have a content repository of some kind that is your home base, and you can use social media posts linking to that content to drive traffic and eventually also search volume.

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I'd appreciate seeing your blog post Lee… any link to share?

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Thank you, @LeeAase. We do have a blog on the website and publish a 2-3 times a week already. Therein lies my dilemma – do I increase the frequency to 12-15 times a week to feature all of these additional items that have been curated and shared only on social media? That adds capacity considerations for a small staff. Or do I come up with some kind of compromise. I'm wondering if a compromise is creating a weekly post containing just curated content would be a compromise that the current in-house team could handle. Or if there's a better way. Thank you again.

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@drpaulam

I'd appreciate seeing your blog post Lee… any link to share?

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Here it is @drpaulam … as I did a Google search for "reasons not to protect your tweets" I found that it has been featured as a Google Snippet. https://social-media-university-global.org/2010/06/twitter-135-10-reasons-to-not-protect-your-tweets/

Liked by Dr Paula Miceli

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@lyndagmitchell

Thank you, @LeeAase. We do have a blog on the website and publish a 2-3 times a week already. Therein lies my dilemma – do I increase the frequency to 12-15 times a week to feature all of these additional items that have been curated and shared only on social media? That adds capacity considerations for a small staff. Or do I come up with some kind of compromise. I'm wondering if a compromise is creating a weekly post containing just curated content would be a compromise that the current in-house team could handle. Or if there's a better way. Thank you again.

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I would suggest maybe you ramp up a little in the blog post frequency to see what happens. I don't think a roundup post on multiple topics would likely help much with SEO, but you could try that.

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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I'm a big fan of explainer content. I'd search to see if it exists already for your community/supporters. If it doesn't, try creating explainer content (written, video, or infographics) with good SEO, and hopefully, these pieces will over time show up at the top of organic search. Content like this is evergreen so will go a long way and can be shared over and over through email, social, etc.

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One other idea that could be a good experiment. Have you tried a twitter video synopsis (<30 secs) of some of you blog and evergreen content, then include a link? Whenever I use twitter video, it gets a x 10 engagement boast.

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I know I'm late on this, but things have been busy (Texas is not handling COVID well). About 7 years ago, we started our online newsroom and established it as our hub for PR. It took us a while to establish it. We aren't the Mayo Clinic and didn't have the brand awareness of some of the bigger institutions. Plus, the leadership prior to when we arrived weren't big on any type of publicity.

At first, we were totally dependent on our social posts at first and how they did. Over time, we now get as many views from Google/SEO as we do from social media. As Lee was saying, we've had people come to our hospital in Fort Worth from as far away as San Francisco and Detroit because they found a newsroom story online. A grandmother in Australia saw one of our newsroom posts and forwarded it to her family in San Francisco.

Just yesterday, our social media specialist talked to a newly hired news director of our NBC affiliate. The first thing she did was show her our newsroom. The health reporter at that same station told us that the first thing she does when she gets into work is to look at our newsroom. It gives the media a resource with our experts and it helps to shape the story better than a quick phone call.

We are a small staff, but we've had around 100 physicians who have participated in the newsroom because they see the value (but it took a couple of years to show them). It took time to build traction and an audience, but we currently have more than 1.5 million views at this point in the year.

We tried to do more stories at first, but now we settle for about one story a day and then maybe another social post. Our social media specialist is awesome and she generates great quick content too that don't necessarily belong on the newsroom. Sometimes the story lives on our main Facebook page (as well as other social media channels) and sometimes it lives on the newsroom's Facebook that we started to keep up with our volume.

We keep up with the news and work real hard to be current and follow trending stories. We also aren't afraid to stay ahead of the curve. A group of more than 50 of our physicians came up with back to school guidelines and sent them to the governor. They did this before the AAP and the state established their own.

All of our content is generated by us. Our media specialist rarely sends out a press release, but instead sends out the newsroom story. She also sends an e-newsletter to all of her media contents with what's on the newsroom that week.

Oh, and last week we were cited in the Lancet. They pulled from our post about the amount of child abuse seen during COVID.

Our newsroom has completely changed the way we work. I've rambled and I'm late to the conversation, but hope this helps.

Liked by Lee Aase

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Jeff – Your newsroom looks very active, and with very timely articles. Great job. https://www.checkupnewsroom.com/?h=1&t=covid-19

For your newroom content, are you reaching out to your cadre of physicians or are they reaching out to you for stories?

Also, i am curious, although I see the link back to your hopsitals home page, is there any access from your hopsitals homepage to the newsroom?

Liked by Lee Aase

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Thank you. That means a lot Dr. Rehrl and thank you for the plug. To answer your questions. First with the physicians … it has become a mix. The doctors have my cell and I have their numbers now. Just last night, a doctor sent me a text with a "what about this post?" idea.

It didn't start that way though. We found some allies and doctors who wanted to be involved early, but only a few. Then we had them become evangelists for us. Now, I have new doctors reaching out every week about posting. The story I mentioned earlier about the abuse during COVID began with someone from our Child Abuse team coming to us and asking us to get something out. They literally walked over to where we were located. I went and interviewed the medical director of that team right away and we got something out that day. Since then our media specialist has gotten that story all over the news, including many national outlets. So, it's a very healthy mix with our physicians and we've developed a great relationship with them. I think they also have developed a healthy respect for us and what we do because they get to see it up close and feel more of a connection to it.

To your second question. The short answer (too late) is yes. Our .org page, uses our content on its home page and also with the physicians' bios. So along with where they went to school and their usual bio information, you will find all of their newsroom stories. It has really helped break down barriers between us and Marketing. The Foundation is now using our content too, using it in their magazine, their social posts and their e-newsletter.

Liked by Lee Aase

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My old clinic has a 2 blogs on its home, one of which was picked up by the local newspaper, and has been quite successful within that narrow topic family psychology.
https://everettclinic.com/blog/addressing-anxiety-restrictions-ease
Another example is the Optum Health Conversations Blog, which—since Optum is part of the largest healthcare company in the world—is a good representation of the direction of healthcare and big data/AI. (Most of Optum's posts are written by VP type folks and give more of a PR feel).
https://www.optum.com/blog.html
But, unlike these, I think the key to yours is that you are tapping into the broad and deep intellectual capital of your clinical folks in a very timely manner.

I am going to sit with the "newsroom" concept a bit, but I suspect a lot of healthcare orgs could benefit from your structure.

Liked by Lee Aase

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@matthewrehrl

My old clinic has a 2 blogs on its home, one of which was picked up by the local newspaper, and has been quite successful within that narrow topic family psychology.
https://everettclinic.com/blog/addressing-anxiety-restrictions-ease
Another example is the Optum Health Conversations Blog, which—since Optum is part of the largest healthcare company in the world—is a good representation of the direction of healthcare and big data/AI. (Most of Optum's posts are written by VP type folks and give more of a PR feel).
https://www.optum.com/blog.html
But, unlike these, I think the key to yours is that you are tapping into the broad and deep intellectual capital of your clinical folks in a very timely manner.

I am going to sit with the "newsroom" concept a bit, but I suspect a lot of healthcare orgs could benefit from your structure.

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We started out posting blogs on our .org site. The problem was it was sometimes difficult to be timely. I'm asking the webmaster to drop everything he's doing and post for us. I wanted the ability to post on my own quicker timeline. The newsroom allowed us to do that and to establish our own identity. I think it's helped with the credibility from news outlets too. There's just enough separation there. Not a lot, but enough. We try to write our posts as a news story and use our people as an experts. People are too savvy if you try to be too "PRish."

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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