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Tools for Vaccine Confidence Building...

Posted by Dr Paula Miceli @drpaulam, Dec 29, 2020

This looks like a great start o building vaccine confidence. CDC released it around Dec 14th, and it includes sample social media posts.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have released a communications toolkit to help healthcare organizations inform their staff and the public about the COVID-19 vaccine. …."
https://www.ems1.com/vaccine/articles/cdc-releases-covid-19-vaccine-communication-toolkit-for-healthcare-organizations-qIl2MmsIyqRgxaF9/
I found another document related to communicating about vaccines.
A good read and some clear applications of social psychology.
https://obssr.od.nih.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/COVIDReport_Final.pdf
Has anyone started using it yet? How has it been going?

Paula

Thanks for sharing this link. All the info for twitter, facebook etc is geared toward those working in the Health care system or for those working or living in long term care facilities. I wish they had a toolkit for health / cancer advocacy organizations and advocates to use.

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These are wonderful resources! Thank you for sharing. We have started to put together an outreach plan and right now are building content and creating a strategy for information dissemination. Our hope is to develop a toolkit of sorts that we can share with both employees and our community partners so that they can share information with their communities.

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@laurynb

These are wonderful resources! Thank you for sharing. We have started to put together an outreach plan and right now are building content and creating a strategy for information dissemination. Our hope is to develop a toolkit of sorts that we can share with both employees and our community partners so that they can share information with their communities.

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Keep us posted! Rooting for you!
On a side note, I've started promoting vaccination on my twitter feed and just started to attract pandemic non-believers. It will be an interesting time.
P.

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@womenofteal

Thanks for sharing this link. All the info for twitter, facebook etc is geared toward those working in the Health care system or for those working or living in long term care facilities. I wish they had a toolkit for health / cancer advocacy organizations and advocates to use.

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Yes, the guidance is tailored for broad systems of care. Is there any way to tailor it to your needs? I, too, did not find it immediately suitable for my workshop development with physicians, but have been extracting themes and core principles to apply to my specific needs. Perhaps others on this network will have some suggestions too.

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The CDC information is exceptionally solid, evidence-based information, and I think generally underutilized/not utilized by most healthcare organizations. It probably should form the backbone of any social media campaign, (campaigns, which, I believe, should be regionally coordinated, rather than organizationally coordinated—but I'll save that for another time :0)).

However—and I think this is important—I project that it is going to be unlikely we will achieve >60% vaccination acceptance unless/until this pandemic gets much worse. Now, it may be possible to hit 70-80% vaccination rate within an organization's patient population if all tools are being used, but it's unlikely that will translate to the same percentage within the community/county—and that is the percentage Covid cares about.

So, what to do? Well, the CDC and State Health Department content should be the backbone of the content, and superimposed on that should be internal experts (for example, have one of the oncologists talk about vaccination challenges in the context of such things a planned chemotherapy/Obs talking about pregnancy etc), however, I think to go to the next level—to reach the 40% who will decline vaccinations this year—I think there should be regional efforts to create emotionally resonating content (which I would say the CDC isn't necessarily great at).

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Thanks Matthew. Do you see any opportunities to facilitate vaccination acceptance in health care workers? The recent news about their vaccine refusal appeared to get a lot of coverage on twitter discussions.

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There have been some legal issues with influenza vaccinations being mandatory for nurses; mostly centered around union rights—but i don't think any has yet have made it to the Supreme Court: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2882617/

I suspect over the next year there will be some type of test case: Can staff be dismissed for vaccine refusal? But I suspect most hospitals are in wait-and-see mode. Personally, I tend to fall in the middle: I think the State legislature has the right to mandate vaccines for workers, but not the corporation, because at least with the State Legislature a person does have recourse ( by voting).

But I suspect you are looking for a more positive approach—a carrot rather than a stick.

One thing a CEO could do is set internal and external goals for staff vaccination rate, perhaps making an all-staff bonus contingent on meeting these goals? Perhaps the CEO could honor the staff giving the vaccines, with internal videos, etc. thanking them for saving lives? Perhaps a weekly email from the CEO, talking about percent of staff getting vaccinated, thanking them for protecting vulnerable patients? Perhaps—if you have the right patient, with consent—even getting patient testimonials thanking the staff for being vaccinated. Perhaps get your ID expert to live stream/tape anonymous questions from the staff vaccine-hesitant? ( I tend to think it is a waste of energy addressing "questions" from anti-vaccine activists). Perhaps get one of your national guard docs to talk about vaccination in the military, duty, etc. ( Keep in mind that Geroge Washington was all about vaccination/quarantine). Perhaps a "patriotism" contest for the staff's high school children such as "Best Tick-Toc video on citizenship and vaccination….

Anyway just some ideas. Bottom line—I think you need to approach this from evidence-based medicine, emotional resonance, and, eventually, legal means. Note: I think, because of the complicated interrelationship of state and federal laws regarding vaccination, some probable anti-vaccine activist resistance, and perhaps some bad blood from admin-staff issues with PPE last year, I think legal/HR should weigh in on how to approach this.

(FYI-this is personal brainstorming, where I went initially for quantity over quality of ideas)

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Positive approaches seem to be the most helpful in the long term. Negative approaches often have short-term gains, but long term drawbacks. In my experience as a health care professional, certainly goal setting in the organization (or clinic) is key and there is good anecdotal evidence (perhaps even scientific) that goal-setting leads to more faithful execution of tasks related to vaccine education, awareness and patient-provider conversations in primary care. I would imagine the same can be applied to organizations of health care workers, as you mention. Great points, Matthew.

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