Discussions

Social Response & Patient Experience Collaboration

Posted by Dena Brannen @denabrannen, Dec 20, 2018

Hello all! We are expanding our social media efforts and looking to this group to see if anyone can weigh-in on their processes around social media service recovery or direct me to any resources that may be helpful.

While our social media team responds to social media commentary 7 days per week, we are working to emphasize the importance of service recovery with our patient experience team. Here are a couple of quick questions that I am looking for feedback on:

1) Do you have a time expectation of service recovery from patient experience (i.e. 12 hours, 24 hours, etc)?
2) Do you triage all your social media issues to the appropriate patient experience contact after a response is posted on social media? Any examples of structure or process are helpful.
3) Does your patient experience team see all social media issues as they come in or do they receive a weekly/monthly report or a combination of both? One of our biggest challenges is around social comments that may be about a past experience; while there are meaningful insights from these comments the patient experience team doesn't place as much of an importance around the past experiences.
4) Any best practices or resources are extremely helpful!

Thank you,
Dena

Hi @denabrannen. @cabbotts and @dwoody1 from Indiana University Health presented a great webinar on this topic last year. Here's the link: https://socialmedia.mayoclinic.org/webinar/social-media-the-new-call-center/?date=1526947200 Hoping Chris or Daniel may chime in with some more specific answers here.

What has been happening at Bay Care to raise this question?

Liked by Dena Brannen

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i have always felt that there was an opportunity cost with service recovery efforts. In particular, I have always thought that the time spent by social media creators and gatekeepers would be better spent towards measurable, medical and financial outcome metrics (such as, for example, improved flu vaccine rates) versus responding to patient complaints. ( With this background in mind, after several years of effort, I finally got my prior organization to remove there Facebook Reviews section. )

Question: Usually the people that are assigned for service recovery issues are some of the highest EQ people within an organization. These are the people who are the best listeners, and therefore, often the best communicators. For lack of a better term, these are the “organizational empathy”. Is this the best use of their craft in the context of a healthcare organization’s deepest mission?

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@dahinmon

Hi @denabrannen. @cabbotts and @dwoody1 from Indiana University Health presented a great webinar on this topic last year. Here's the link: https://socialmedia.mayoclinic.org/webinar/social-media-the-new-call-center/?date=1526947200 Hoping Chris or Daniel may chime in with some more specific answers here.

What has been happening at Bay Care to raise this question?

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Hi @DanHinmon Thanks for sending the video – there are some great tips and I found it helpful. We are trying to build a more streamlined process with our hospital division patient experience team. While we have done a great deal of education around the real-time impact of social media and customer service we have some opportunities to build a process that everyone is comfortable with. For example, their process is to follow-up within 72 hours – as you know this is light years in social media. They have asked that we post this with our social media replies. Additionally, they do not want their phone numbers posted publically in our responses (these cannot be triaged to our call center). I am meeting with the team on best practices given we are rolling out proactive review requesting for eight of our hospitals next year. Thanks for any additional insight! -Dena

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@denabrannen

Hi @DanHinmon Thanks for sending the video – there are some great tips and I found it helpful. We are trying to build a more streamlined process with our hospital division patient experience team. While we have done a great deal of education around the real-time impact of social media and customer service we have some opportunities to build a process that everyone is comfortable with. For example, their process is to follow-up within 72 hours – as you know this is light years in social media. They have asked that we post this with our social media replies. Additionally, they do not want their phone numbers posted publically in our responses (these cannot be triaged to our call center). I am meeting with the team on best practices given we are rolling out proactive review requesting for eight of our hospitals next year. Thanks for any additional insight! -Dena

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Hi @denabrannen – We use Sprinklr for our social media management system at Mayo Clinic, and one of the things we're exploring is providing seat licenses for at least a couple of our Office of Patient Experience (OPE) staff, so that instead of replying with contact info for OPE we can hopefully shortcut to a quicker answer. Also, the patient may already be in touch with OPE, so saying they should call OPE could be more irritating than helpful. Still a work in progress but I think we're moving in the right direction.

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Hi @LeeAase This is very helpful indeed. I would like to see us get to that point eventually. In your current state, do you respond to social comments with the appropriate OPE contact depending upon where the issue fell within the system? Do you have any service standards in which the OPE team should follow-up with the patient on their issue? This is all very helpful! Thank you!

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@denabrannen

Hi @LeeAase This is very helpful indeed. I would like to see us get to that point eventually. In your current state, do you respond to social comments with the appropriate OPE contact depending upon where the issue fell within the system? Do you have any service standards in which the OPE team should follow-up with the patient on their issue? This is all very helpful! Thank you!

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Yes, we usually do reply with the OPE contact. Sometimes we don't know which site (AZ, FL, MN) is involved so in those cases we give all three numbers. Then it becomes a matter of OPE living up to its own service standards for responding to calls. Ideally since the person is reaching out on Facebook we'd like to have the private message conversation happening there…since it was the patient's first choice. But for now we're putting them in touch by phone.

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Hi again @LeeAase This is very helpful! When possible we are providing a designated email inbox AND phone number to give the patient the option. We do try to direct the patient to direct messaging first to collect additional information before sending to our patient experience teams. Thanks again for all of your assistance and Happy New Year! -Dena

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@denabrannen @LeeAase – Can either of you speak to how or when you involve your risk management team. We have a a new VP of PE and her prior organization had all complaints put into their Risk Management software and then the correct person in management and/or OPE was assigned the complaint or issue. We're moving toward this direction now and I have mixed feelings. I like that I am being taken out of the equation a bit and we're getting this in a trackable system for service recovery and follow up as opposed to my email being the 'system.' However, I am worried about the prompt follow up. Can either of your speak to your organizations' approach to integrating OPE and Risk Management in your social media strategies? Thank you!

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Also- along the same line of questioning. We are a small community and I have encouraged our staff to keep me posted when they come across an individual's post speaking negatively about our service. With a name like "Blessing" we have not found a social listening tool that is fool proof for us uncovering these when we are not tagged. We are often sent images/screenshots of individual's posts and then we can perform service recovery as an organization. It has led to some very positive results for us. However, we're concerned about the user's privacy when these posts are sent to us and it was a private post that we could not see if it had not been screen shot and shared. Do you all have an approach to deal with service recovery opportunities when the posts are private and you are made aware of them? Thanks, again! Lots of conversation at our organization right now around these OPE and Risk Management overlap with social media. Appreciate hearing your approach and insights!

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@lucybordewick

@denabrannen @LeeAase – Can either of you speak to how or when you involve your risk management team. We have a a new VP of PE and her prior organization had all complaints put into their Risk Management software and then the correct person in management and/or OPE was assigned the complaint or issue. We're moving toward this direction now and I have mixed feelings. I like that I am being taken out of the equation a bit and we're getting this in a trackable system for service recovery and follow up as opposed to my email being the 'system.' However, I am worried about the prompt follow up. Can either of your speak to your organizations' approach to integrating OPE and Risk Management in your social media strategies? Thank you!

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Good thoughts. We don't want to be a shadow OPE. We have people in OPE whose job it is to handle these complaints, and so our goal is to have them get the cases as quickly as possible. That's why we would like to get them on our Sprinklr system, to cut out the step of asking the patient to contact OPE. What is the Risk Management software Blessing uses?

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@lucybordewick

Also- along the same line of questioning. We are a small community and I have encouraged our staff to keep me posted when they come across an individual's post speaking negatively about our service. With a name like "Blessing" we have not found a social listening tool that is fool proof for us uncovering these when we are not tagged. We are often sent images/screenshots of individual's posts and then we can perform service recovery as an organization. It has led to some very positive results for us. However, we're concerned about the user's privacy when these posts are sent to us and it was a private post that we could not see if it had not been screen shot and shared. Do you all have an approach to deal with service recovery opportunities when the posts are private and you are made aware of them? Thanks, again! Lots of conversation at our organization right now around these OPE and Risk Management overlap with social media. Appreciate hearing your approach and insights!

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Another really good question. I think we would check first to see whether the post is one we could have seen. If we could have seen it but just hadn't then it's pretty straightforward.

It's a bit more complicated when the post's privacy settings wouldn't let non-friends see it. I guess in a situation like that I might reach out and says something like "I work for Blessing, and another Facebook user mentioned in an email that you have some concerns. If you'd like to contact me directly I'd be happy to get you connected with our Office of Patient Experience. We'd like to see what we can do to help."

I guess it also would depend somewhat on the nature of the original post. Is it flaming and antagonistic or expressing mild dissatisfaction?

You said you've seen some good results from this outreach. Have you had issue where someone felt their post privacy was violated?

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@LeeAase

Good thoughts. We don't want to be a shadow OPE. We have people in OPE whose job it is to handle these complaints, and so our goal is to have them get the cases as quickly as possible. That's why we would like to get them on our Sprinklr system, to cut out the step of asking the patient to contact OPE. What is the Risk Management software Blessing uses?

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We use RL Solutions software for complaint tracking/follow up. So with this new approach, our digital team will be logging any complaints that come in through social media or our contact us email platform in that software. Our OPE is really new so the service line director has historically taken the lead. Logging complaints from online into the RL Solutions software will assign the service line leader the complaint and task them with follow up. The direction we're getting, which I agree with, is to get the conversation offline as quickly as possible and connect the patient/family member with a person that can address the issue. However, I worry that timelines in our digital world might demand more prompt response than they are prepared to do.

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@LeeAase

Another really good question. I think we would check first to see whether the post is one we could have seen. If we could have seen it but just hadn't then it's pretty straightforward.

It's a bit more complicated when the post's privacy settings wouldn't let non-friends see it. I guess in a situation like that I might reach out and says something like "I work for Blessing, and another Facebook user mentioned in an email that you have some concerns. If you'd like to contact me directly I'd be happy to get you connected with our Office of Patient Experience. We'd like to see what we can do to help."

I guess it also would depend somewhat on the nature of the original post. Is it flaming and antagonistic or expressing mild dissatisfaction?

You said you've seen some good results from this outreach. Have you had issue where someone felt their post privacy was violated?

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We have never had someone be upset that we have reached out to them as a result of addressing a private post.

What we usually tell the service line leader is that the information we received about the issue came in confidentially and we need to be discreet in the way we follow up on it. I.E. if the patient is still with us in house, just go round and ask probing questions rather than outing the fact that a connection of theirs on social media shared their post.

The concern came up that a less-than-savvy or new leader might mishandle that confidential/private part and say, "A friend of yours on Facebook shared your concern…" that could potentially lead to a privacy debate.

I'm not sure I feel anyone should expect that level of privacy on social media (I preach this to our staff regularly, treat it as if anyone can see it regardless of your privacy settings). However, I very much understand that someone could feel violated and it's a murky area.

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@LeeAase

Hi @denabrannen – We use Sprinklr for our social media management system at Mayo Clinic, and one of the things we're exploring is providing seat licenses for at least a couple of our Office of Patient Experience (OPE) staff, so that instead of replying with contact info for OPE we can hopefully shortcut to a quicker answer. Also, the patient may already be in touch with OPE, so saying they should call OPE could be more irritating than helpful. Still a work in progress but I think we're moving in the right direction.

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@LeeAase In the spirit of process discussions, I am also curious how Mayo supports social media engagement from a social media and/or call center perspective. Do you have your monitoring and engagement team centralized, and if so, how do you staff your team? At BayCare, we have a team of social media agents that reside in our call center and then our social media team rotates call to address issues that may be escalated in nature. Do you have an on-call team and if so who participates in the on-call rotation?

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I'm so excited to see this topic discussed so we can share ideas. Here at Cook Children's Health Care system the goal is to respond within 24-48 hours to complaints, take it offline and attempt service recovery. Patient reps handle our medical center and practice managers handle the clinics. If the reviewer is currently at one of our locations, then we notify someone at that location to find the reviewer and offer assistance. If the issue has medical risk, then legal and risk become involved and the complaint goes through their process. I worked with our process improvement team on a process map to clarify the steps above.

In every case, we respond to the reviewer and thank them for bringing the situation to our attention. We then ask for them to email or DM us so we can listen to their concerns. About 10% take us up on it, billing concerns always do. In about 2% of the cases, they change the bad review to a positive one.

At the monthly manager meetings we've been sharing best practices from online service recoveries. We're starting to put together tip sheets for training staff developed from the most common complaints. This fits in perfectly with the patient experience.

What we need to do is track better. Thank you Lucy for the recommendation of RL Solutions. I'll be looking in to that!

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