Discussions

Social Media & COVID

Posted by Jessica Carter @carterj, Wed, Jun 24 11:04am

Has anyone seen any eye-catching social media campaigns around COVID prevention?

I would take a hard look at the CDC social media platform.

Incidentally, I may be misinterpreting it, but I believe the CDC’s social media growth has been phenomenal over the past 6 months, likely due to CoVid. Consider that one of the CDCs principle twitter accounts, @cdcgov had 1.24 million followers in Dec 2019 and now has 2.8 million followers 6 months later. Here’s a link to the cdc metrics page: https://www.cdc.gov/metrics/socialmedia/micro-blogs.html

(I’ve always found the CDC to have one of the best intergrated website/social media health platforms, well with studying; Another is the VA)

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Being in NJ, we just came out of the intense COVID-19 wave here. What we found is that COVID prevention, and CDC information did not resonate with our followers. I think their feeds are saturated with CDC information. What caught fire for us were human interest stories, especially videos of COVID patient discharges, our most recent having been hospitalized 88 days! It's been a story of humanity. Considering the traditional media have no access to our hospitals, we need to be the voice.

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@ewhitmore

Being in NJ, we just came out of the intense COVID-19 wave here. What we found is that COVID prevention, and CDC information did not resonate with our followers. I think their feeds are saturated with CDC information. What caught fire for us were human interest stories, especially videos of COVID patient discharges, our most recent having been hospitalized 88 days! It's been a story of humanity. Considering the traditional media have no access to our hospitals, we need to be the voice.

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I am curious how you handle the discharges – I assume the family/patient gives you permission to share their discharge video. Weeks ago I read a post on Twitter from a psychologist who said to stop filming patients leaving the hospital because it just adds to the trauma the patient has endured and is only a way for the hospitals/ doctors to look like they are doing a good job. I pushed back on that and said if the patient has approved the filming why not give the community some hope. He said asking a person who has had a trauma to do this is pressuring them and they may not realize the harm they are doing themselves. As for the patient getting cheered by the nurses and docs being a promotion of the hospital he pretty much said don't they ( nurses) have more important things to do. How would you have responded. ( I tried to find the back and forth I had but since I can't remember around which date this took place I can't find it. )

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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@womenofteal

I am curious how you handle the discharges – I assume the family/patient gives you permission to share their discharge video. Weeks ago I read a post on Twitter from a psychologist who said to stop filming patients leaving the hospital because it just adds to the trauma the patient has endured and is only a way for the hospitals/ doctors to look like they are doing a good job. I pushed back on that and said if the patient has approved the filming why not give the community some hope. He said asking a person who has had a trauma to do this is pressuring them and they may not realize the harm they are doing themselves. As for the patient getting cheered by the nurses and docs being a promotion of the hospital he pretty much said don't they ( nurses) have more important things to do. How would you have responded. ( I tried to find the back and forth I had but since I can't remember around which date this took place I can't find it. )

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What is the value of feel-good videos videos in relation to an organization's mission?

(There is where I think having a written mission statement is important).

There is probably some non-specific branding value, and perhaps some non-specific emotional value to viewers, but home does it specifically address one's mission?

Most orgs have specific written goals which feed into their mission, and usually these goals have some measurablility. So for example, for CoVid, perhaps a measurable proxy goal for marketing to pursue is decreased hospitalization rate, and a hospital marketing focus may therefore need to be improved mask-wearing and social distancing, (the real goal for marketing may be county level CoVid Morality).

Anyway, that's one of my pet leaves with healthcare CEOs, They tend to box marketing/social media within the COOs domain, perhaps with some branding goals or patient volume/acquisition goals. I drift towards the idea that social media within healthcare should principally be under the Chief Medical Officers domain, and be focusing on those metrics. (Mortality/morbity prevention).

Let me rephrase this: Given limited resources, which is a "better" video? One which makes people feel a little better about CoVid, or one that gets teenagers in the community to go from a mask wearing rate of 10% to 30%? I think it's the latter, though I agree the latter is much, much more difficult.

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@womenofteal

I am curious how you handle the discharges – I assume the family/patient gives you permission to share their discharge video. Weeks ago I read a post on Twitter from a psychologist who said to stop filming patients leaving the hospital because it just adds to the trauma the patient has endured and is only a way for the hospitals/ doctors to look like they are doing a good job. I pushed back on that and said if the patient has approved the filming why not give the community some hope. He said asking a person who has had a trauma to do this is pressuring them and they may not realize the harm they are doing themselves. As for the patient getting cheered by the nurses and docs being a promotion of the hospital he pretty much said don't they ( nurses) have more important things to do. How would you have responded. ( I tried to find the back and forth I had but since I can't remember around which date this took place I can't find it. )

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I can appreciate that your question and marketing work. As a Health Psychologist, I agree with the feedback you received from the Psychologist mentioned in your post, who is raising the issue of ethics. Consent to the video needs to be freely given (eg., free of coercion). The risk is that a patient who has just had their lives saved would feel undue pressure to say yes, and this is relevant to the traumatization process (and rates of traumatization are expected to be high). Trauma-informed consent procedures can be an option. Better practice would be to allow for time between the making of the video and the patient's consent to release on your website – after they have had time to better understand the meaning of their experience, to recover physically and be less dependent on medical care. You could follow-up 6 months later, provide a copy for them to view and ask for consent – which would increase their level of freedom to say no (and thus, address the coercive aspect).

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@drpaulam

I can appreciate that your question and marketing work. As a Health Psychologist, I agree with the feedback you received from the Psychologist mentioned in your post, who is raising the issue of ethics. Consent to the video needs to be freely given (eg., free of coercion). The risk is that a patient who has just had their lives saved would feel undue pressure to say yes, and this is relevant to the traumatization process (and rates of traumatization are expected to be high). Trauma-informed consent procedures can be an option. Better practice would be to allow for time between the making of the video and the patient's consent to release on your website – after they have had time to better understand the meaning of their experience, to recover physically and be less dependent on medical care. You could follow-up 6 months later, provide a copy for them to view and ask for consent – which would increase their level of freedom to say no (and thus, address the coercive aspect).

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I am not a health care provider or affiliated with a hospital. I am a cancer survivor and research advocate and Twitter cancer community co-founder. I am aware of insuring there is no coercion when consenting for clinical trial participation so I appreciate your further explanation about consent in this case. Thank you for sharing. How are these videos any different than taking photos of cancer patients being treated or sharing their survivor stories during a video promoting research at a Cancer Center? Is there coercion there too?
Matthew – If the mission of a hospital is the health including mental health of the public they serve then these videos may be helpful to ease anxiety in the general public about connecting hospitalization = death from Covid. Then the question is timing of video release. I see your point about wearing masks may be more important than a successful treatment and agree.

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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I understand. The risk of coercion stems from the imbalance of power in the doctor-patient relationship (the patient is dependent on the doctor) and so the use of power is the factor to be considered. I would presume there are written articles on this issue – you might check the American Psychological Association ethical code or other books on Ethics of consent. My initial reaction to your question is that photos are less intrusive than videos (although both will reveal their identities), but yes, coercion may be a factor. Again, providing clients/patients with time and distance from the medical situations are one way to mitigate the influence of those requesting the video/image. Others are possible. It is a complicated issue – there is no 'one size fits all' in it, but there are central principles that need to be considered. As an option, you could ask for consultations from a bioethicist or a psychologist involved in the treatment team (eg., oncology unit).

Liked by Women of Teal

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@womenofteal

I am curious how you handle the discharges – I assume the family/patient gives you permission to share their discharge video. Weeks ago I read a post on Twitter from a psychologist who said to stop filming patients leaving the hospital because it just adds to the trauma the patient has endured and is only a way for the hospitals/ doctors to look like they are doing a good job. I pushed back on that and said if the patient has approved the filming why not give the community some hope. He said asking a person who has had a trauma to do this is pressuring them and they may not realize the harm they are doing themselves. As for the patient getting cheered by the nurses and docs being a promotion of the hospital he pretty much said don't they ( nurses) have more important things to do. How would you have responded. ( I tried to find the back and forth I had but since I can't remember around which date this took place I can't find it. )

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Yes we are very sensitive to all of these considerations and made sure it never was an exploitive situation. We only filmed a few cases where the patient AND the family were agreeable and our media release form was signed. It was a time of celebration for all. Also, in most cases this was a brief window of time when the family got to see their loved one, before they were transported to another sub acute facility with no visitation. We felt this brief visit and celebration was a boost to the patient's immune system and healing. As to the comment about nurses and doctors having better things to do, most of the staff in our "clap outs" were support staff, clergy, and administrators who could take a few minutes out of their duties to celebrate with the patient. And many times the direct care team would try to stop by briefly to say goodbye, if they could. They had developed strong reciprocal connections with their patients.

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