Discussions

should a clinic delete its FB page?

Posted by Megan Rowe @MeganRowe, Nov 12, 2018

One of our clinics started a FB page with the best of intentions, but they've since admitted they bit off more than they can chew. They haven't updated it in months, and they say it's become a repository for negative comments and reviews. (This may be an exaggeration; as far as I can tell, they've gotten about 5 negative comments/reviews in 18 months.) They're asking for my help with an "exit strategy."

Are there any advantages, SEO or otherwise, to keeping the page up if they don't want to put any work into it? What if they turned off Messaging and the ability for visitors to post and just checked every couple of days for comments? This is a pretty heavily traveled clinic, so I suspect if they delete their page, someone will create an unofficial one by checking in. If they do delete it, should they post an announcement that they'll be deleting, or just delete?

Fascinating dilemma that many of us are pondering personally and professionally these days. Does the clinic have a marketing plan? Here's a short article that ponders this issue https://neilpatel.com/blog/should-you-delete-facebook/

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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I'll bet the essence of the problem is they have one or two administrative "gatekeepers" who can't keep up and isn't interested in generating fresh content. They see it as an extra task on their to-do list that they have to maintain – not as a tool to expand mission, make money, or impact disease.

Start off by deleting the review section. This is unlikely to support your mission.

Also, if it is unmonitored daily, then I would probably disable it until you have a system in place to post fresh content and monitor customer/patient content with a system in place to address negative content.

Next, I would ask yourself this: What is really your organizational mission? If you can define it, and its supporting efforts, then Facebook can have a lot value.

For example, if one of your mission specific efforts is to advocate for community flu vaccination, ( the US adult average is 36%, the US CDC goal for healthy adults is 80%, and the number needed to benefit from true herd immunity is 70%)
then create and schedule existing content daily to support this mission.

(You can do this cost and time effectively if you use pre-existing content from very trusted sources such as the CDC Flu page.)

Now, if they see Facebook as mostly a branding tool, and are there just because everyone else is, and you don't have the resources to engage regularly, then maybe it is best to back off.

One other thought. Doe this clinic have 2-3 creatives who just love Facebook and are eager to create and innovate with it? They don't have to be marketing folks – perhaps nurses, or MAs, Lab Techs or receptionists who are responsible but will love the opportunity to expand their horizons? There is a pretty good chance they have a people problem, rather than a Facebook problem, and a fix might just be finding a couple of local ambassadors/innovators who really want to dive in to things…. bring them in to your marketing for a day for some mentoring, chats about HIPPA, etc, and use this as an opportunity to think through a social media ambassador program – also, get them to take the Mayo Hootsuite certification course too if you are a premium organization member…

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@matthewrehrl

I'll bet the essence of the problem is they have one or two administrative "gatekeepers" who can't keep up and isn't interested in generating fresh content. They see it as an extra task on their to-do list that they have to maintain – not as a tool to expand mission, make money, or impact disease.

Start off by deleting the review section. This is unlikely to support your mission.

Also, if it is unmonitored daily, then I would probably disable it until you have a system in place to post fresh content and monitor customer/patient content with a system in place to address negative content.

Next, I would ask yourself this: What is really your organizational mission? If you can define it, and its supporting efforts, then Facebook can have a lot value.

For example, if one of your mission specific efforts is to advocate for community flu vaccination, ( the US adult average is 36%, the US CDC goal for healthy adults is 80%, and the number needed to benefit from true herd immunity is 70%)
then create and schedule existing content daily to support this mission.

(You can do this cost and time effectively if you use pre-existing content from very trusted sources such as the CDC Flu page.)

Now, if they see Facebook as mostly a branding tool, and are there just because everyone else is, and you don't have the resources to engage regularly, then maybe it is best to back off.

One other thought. Doe this clinic have 2-3 creatives who just love Facebook and are eager to create and innovate with it? They don't have to be marketing folks – perhaps nurses, or MAs, Lab Techs or receptionists who are responsible but will love the opportunity to expand their horizons? There is a pretty good chance they have a people problem, rather than a Facebook problem, and a fix might just be finding a couple of local ambassadors/innovators who really want to dive in to things…. bring them in to your marketing for a day for some mentoring, chats about HIPPA, etc, and use this as an opportunity to think through a social media ambassador program – also, get them to take the Mayo Hootsuite certification course too if you are a premium organization member…

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After meeting with them, we've decided to keep the page but disable reviews, disable the ability to post comments on it, and pin a post at the top with their phone and email address.

We're keeping the page because we think another, unofficial one would ultimately get created anyway, and keeping the page might stop that from happening. Also, if they ever do decide it can help them meet their goals, and they have the resources for it, it'll be there.

This area has almost more business than it can handle, so while the page could be a resource of valuable information, like your flu shot example, we could also publish that kind of info on our main hospital page. The clinic's admins recognize the value of FB, and they've been able to find employees interested in helping with it, but ultimately, the problem is that FB falls off the priority list day after day as they address more pressing issues with patients.

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