Discussions

Pokemon Go

Posted by Ben Forstie @ben_forstie, Jul 15, 2016

Question- with all the craze about catching Pokemon, we have an employee who is making public posts to attract people to the hospital to catch Pokemon and drop lures. The post calls for people to drop lures so our patients and visitors can get in on some of the fun in and around the hospital. The post also mentions we have a ‘hot’ poke stop on the third floor near the Women and Infants center…

Not sure what to think about this… should I address it or is it harmless?

Opinion: It may be a “fun” and harmless to explore the area around the mayo buildings, but not in areas of patient care. I wouldn’t like to see someone inside the hospital wondering around with their phone camera open around patients. I wouldn’t encourage it inside the hospitals and patient care buildings.

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I see all kinds of security, HIPAA and privacy violation potential here. Hospitals are for patient care – not playgrounds. Not to mention the reputation damage of treating healthcare like a game. Even if it’s the children’s ward this is a problem.

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Yikes! As the previous posters said, that seems rife with patient privacy and safety issues. I don’t envy your having to address it (if you choose to), since the employee likely has the of best intentions and may label you the Destroyer of Fun, but… yikes.

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@sueannecassidy

Yikes! As the previous posters said, that seems rife with patient privacy and safety issues. I don’t envy your having to address it (if you choose to), since the employee likely has the of best intentions and may label you the Destroyer of Fun, but… yikes.

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Yes, the employee had the best of intentions. It was escalated quickly with Security. We sent a mass internal email addressing the potential safety issues, HIPAA and privacty violation potential. The post the employee made was very quickly shared and liked with super high engagement on a post to one of our hospital pages as well as some buy/sell FB groups. We cannot allow the public to wander our halls, and employees posting public pics of patient areas to the APP.

Yikes, is right!

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We created a Pokemon Go post. You can see it here: https://business.facebook.com/kumedicalcenter/posts/1098400316901378. Since we’re a medical school and research facility, we don’t generally have patients around much of our campus. We took the opportunity to highlight various things about our medical center that the general public might not know we do, like our tree campaign. While we do have The University of Kansas Hospital on our campus, we’re separate organizations and I specifically made sure to stay out of their buildings and only capture Pokemon in public areas.

Liked by Ben Forstie

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Agree with all that’s been said here already. Of interest to the discussion is the Cook Children’s statement which they put on their FB page:

At Cook Children’s, we encourage fun as a way to help our patients and families heal. However, we have to discourage anyone planning to come to our medical center as well as primary and urgent care facilities with the sole purpose of playing Pokemon Go, or similar games.

Our commitment is to the protection, safety and care of our patients and their families. Having people come to our campuses (which are private) with the intention of catching pokemon, instead of seeking patient care, will be asked to leave. In addition to Pokemon Go posing a security risk to our patients, it also puts users at risk of violating federal privacy laws.

Our patients are protected from having their picture taken, and one is only authorized to do so with written consent of a parent or guardian. At Cook Children’s, we encourage fun, but not at the expense of our patients security or privacy. Thank you for understanding.

At Cook Children's, we encourage fun as a way to help our patients and families heal. However, we have to discourage…

Posted by Cook Children's on Friday, July 15, 2016

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@rmullins80

We created a Pokemon Go post. You can see it here: https://business.facebook.com/kumedicalcenter/posts/1098400316901378. Since we’re a medical school and research facility, we don’t generally have patients around much of our campus. We took the opportunity to highlight various things about our medical center that the general public might not know we do, like our tree campaign. While we do have The University of Kansas Hospital on our campus, we’re separate organizations and I specifically made sure to stay out of their buildings and only capture Pokemon in public areas.

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Sounds like a great idea for you-all!

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Here’s a fun video from the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin with guidelines on how to play Pokemon Go! at their hospital. Lots of patients participated. https://www.facebook.com/childrenshospitalwi/?fref=nf

Liked by Annie Hart

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We’re a mental health and addiction hospital and learning centre—
Our primary account posted the number of Pokestops around our main campus, with a gentle reminder to turn the AR off when snapping photos.
I followed up with a QT noting the stops around us, and reinforced the message with “Be a respectful #Poketrainer.”
Sadly, while well recieved, these may be our furthest reaching tweets this month. O_o

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Since we have 22 hospitals, it will be up to each location to decide if they want to encourage it or not. In light of that, I’m trying to come up with guidelines for how to communicate either leaning. One of our hospitals is embracing it and even had a news crew visit about it. If anyone wants to chime in on communications ideas, chime away… 🙂

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@kathywinter

Since we have 22 hospitals, it will be up to each location to decide if they want to encourage it or not. In light of that, I’m trying to come up with guidelines for how to communicate either leaning. One of our hospitals is embracing it and even had a news crew visit about it. If anyone wants to chime in on communications ideas, chime away… 🙂

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Hi Kathy, can you elaborate how the one hospital embraced it? How are the communicating, or using on social media?

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Hi, @meridianhealth,

Sure! Here is a link to a Facebook post (the only one I’ve seen from them) and a news story that aired this week:

http://counton2.com/2016/07/20/pokemon-go-inspires-kids-to-get-out-of-bed-at-childrens-hospital/

Pokemon Go has come to #SHCGreenville! We are the home of two Poke Stops: one at the Shriners statue (Editorial without…

Posted by Greenville Shriners Hospital on Friday, July 15, 2016

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@kathywinter

Hi, @meridianhealth,

Sure! Here is a link to a Facebook post (the only one I’ve seen from them) and a news story that aired this week:

http://counton2.com/2016/07/20/pokemon-go-inspires-kids-to-get-out-of-bed-at-childrens-hospital/

Pokemon Go has come to #SHCGreenville! We are the home of two Poke Stops: one at the Shriners statue (Editorial without…

Posted by Greenville Shriners Hospital on Friday, July 15, 2016

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@kathywinter That’s awesome! We’re working on developing our own standards to embrace Pokemon Go across our hospitals. Do you have any tips for getting leadership buy-in? It seems the knee-jerk reaction is to outright ban.

Ultimately, we’d like to use Pokemon Go to promote fitness and educate people about our campuses. Most of our Pokestops are at fountain and statues outside – things we’ve considered highlighting on social anyway. Some of our campuses even have walking trails we’d like to encourage people to use and Pokemon Go seems like a great way to do it.

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