Discussions

Need Help with a New Product Rollout

Posted by Brendan McAdams @brendanmcadams, Mon, Sep 23 11:40am

I hope that the MCSMN brain trust can be of help here…

We've developed a new feature on our site(www.expertscape.com) that will enable a health system to receive targeted web traffic. (Specifically, visitors that have shown interest in a particular topic/procedure/diagnosis).

My question is this: How do health systems place a dollar value on web traffic? In particular, is there a value that can be assigned to a visitor that comes to a landing page for infertility, or laparoscopic surgery, or celiac disease? (By way of example, a regional hospital marketing person once explained that a bariatric surgery lead was worth ~$500 to them.) And are there any particular considerations that health system marketing folks take into account as they look to drive web traffic and engagement?

Any insights or advice that folks can share would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you,

Brendan

@gumcengagement @matthewrehrl @hackensackmeridianhealth @sarahcollins @kaufeltkm @reedsmith @DanHinmon @nasarwanji

Hi Brendan,

I think a lot of how traffic is measured is based on the KPIs the health system has set. For example, if the hospital wants to promote a bariatric program, maybe the ultimate goal is to increase physician referrals. The KPIs and campaign would look a lot different than a goal of getting patients to sign up for a newsletter on celiac disease.

As far as the cost of a specific type of patient, I'm sure there is plenty of data within a health system, but I would think it would be specific to that hospital and not translate to another health system. I guess you could technically average the cost of a procedure across the board and then estimate the increases in revenue by traffic, but I wouldn't think this would be a very convincing sell because there are so many variables that go into the type of traffic and individual hospital expenses.

This is an interesting question!

REPLY

Narrowing down to new patient acquisition, as a starting point, most COOs will have an estimate of New Patient Acquisition Lifetime value, and most COOs will also track first time, new patient visits on a monthly basis. (Actual patient capture is another, more difficult measure, but may include first time visits followed by another visit over he following year).

For new patients acquired digitally, In theory you could track UTM codes through an on page conversion (click to make appointment) , but with rare exceptions this will be difficult because most new patients will make first appointments by phone. One thing you can do, however, is track a set of website proxy metrics ( such as track a New Patient Information Page) and correlate that over time with actual appointment data, and or EHR data.

One challenge: the appointment system, the EHR system, the billing folks and the website folks are likely in differ nor departments making it difficult to even define easily trackable proxy metrics.

My advice. Start with correlating 2-3 very easy available metrics first (Department Page visits, department patient visits (new and established) and department reception phone calls and track and understand those for a few months, then start thinking about how to measure conversions and ROIs.

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@rmullins80

Hi Brendan,

I think a lot of how traffic is measured is based on the KPIs the health system has set. For example, if the hospital wants to promote a bariatric program, maybe the ultimate goal is to increase physician referrals. The KPIs and campaign would look a lot different than a goal of getting patients to sign up for a newsletter on celiac disease.

As far as the cost of a specific type of patient, I'm sure there is plenty of data within a health system, but I would think it would be specific to that hospital and not translate to another health system. I guess you could technically average the cost of a procedure across the board and then estimate the increases in revenue by traffic, but I wouldn't think this would be a very convincing sell because there are so many variables that go into the type of traffic and individual hospital expenses.

This is an interesting question!

Jump to this post

Rachel,

Thanks for this, and you're confirming my suspicions.Ultimately, we'll need to measure this in conjunction with some of our early adopters. As we progress, I hope to be able to share some of our findings with the group.

Again, thanks!

REPLY
@matthewrehrl

Narrowing down to new patient acquisition, as a starting point, most COOs will have an estimate of New Patient Acquisition Lifetime value, and most COOs will also track first time, new patient visits on a monthly basis. (Actual patient capture is another, more difficult measure, but may include first time visits followed by another visit over he following year).

For new patients acquired digitally, In theory you could track UTM codes through an on page conversion (click to make appointment) , but with rare exceptions this will be difficult because most new patients will make first appointments by phone. One thing you can do, however, is track a set of website proxy metrics ( such as track a New Patient Information Page) and correlate that over time with actual appointment data, and or EHR data.

One challenge: the appointment system, the EHR system, the billing folks and the website folks are likely in differ nor departments making it difficult to even define easily trackable proxy metrics.

My advice. Start with correlating 2-3 very easy available metrics first (Department Page visits, department patient visits (new and established) and department reception phone calls and track and understand those for a few months, then start thinking about how to measure conversions and ROIs.

Jump to this post

Matthew,

As always, your comments and insight are spot on. As the folks at Y Combinator say, figure out what a 10x value-to-cost price is and then adjust accordingly. We'll basically take your last paragraph and put it to work.

Thank you!

Brendan

REPLY
@brendanmcadams

Matthew,

As always, your comments and insight are spot on. As the folks at Y Combinator say, figure out what a 10x value-to-cost price is and then adjust accordingly. We'll basically take your last paragraph and put it to work.

Thank you!

Brendan

Jump to this post

For those that are curious, here's an example that will be rolling out in the next couple of weeks. Basically, it allows a visitor looking for more specific information about a procedure to connect directly with the institution.

I'll gladly take any comments, critique, or questions. And thank you again for the feedback already shared.

Brendan

Duke Ortho

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