Discussions

Multiple Social Accounts for Hospital Campuses

Posted by Camille Bautista-Fryer @cambautista, Nov 5, 2019

Hello,

Have your organizations seen particular benefits or return on investment in having location-specific social accounts, or specific benefits from having just one main account for an enterprise?

For example, if a hospital enterprise has several locations (different states, different cities), do you find it beneficial to have one account for each?

Thanks much,
Camille

In the time of mergers and acquisitions it’s ever more common to have a local account which already has value, but for a hospital specically the advantage of a unique account from a health perspective is you can leverage and work with local organizations such as the local health department, local fire, local newspapers etc.

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Thanks for raising the question, @cambautista. At Mayo Clinic we have just one Enterprise account for Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and LinkedIn, even though we have campuses in Arizona, Minnesota, and Florida. We have many other accounts that are particular to the individual campuses. I'll tag a few other members who represent multi-campus systems: @jesslewis422 @kathywinter @andrewmcglothlen @zanin @cabbotts @apafford @tvarona @mdethlefsen

Liked by Rob Zanin

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I came into MaineHealth pretty much as the process of 'unification' began. Our health system has about a dozen hospitals and 100s of smaller practice locations. Most are in Maine but we have a major hospital in New Hampshire as well.

As I inherited it, we have individual accounts for all of our hospitals but not our smaller locations. I have tested the waters with using 'Locations' on Facebook to see whether there is much value in having people 'check-in' and be able to recommend individual practices. I'm not convinced yet.

If I were to start where we are today with a clean slate on social, I would have chosen a very different path for how we structure our social accounts. I like the idea of having a single enterprise account, like Mayo Clinic, just for manageability. But we are still moving towards a unified state and right now these hospitals all have unique identities that mean something to the communities they serve.

It's a tough call to make, but you may want to consider if you have the resources to manage multiple individual pages that are geographically separated.

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I love this question and think it's deceptively complicated. @rplattmmc is thinking about the opportunity cost similarly to us. IMHO, you should consider your acquisition and support strategy, just as much as your ability to execute CX and generate meaningful content. Also consider your willingness to do a difficult, time-consuming thing that could have great ROI down the road, which your competitors often will not consider chasing, simply because it's hard. There are existential brand equity questions to consider; like, "Would consolidation bolster brand perception; or, would consolidation hurt the brand's ability to be discovered in strategic markets in a meaningful way?" My position over the next 18 months is: go as wide and as broad as feasibly possible with great content and support these channels, and wrangle them with tech (we use Sprinklr). Will follow up in 2021 and let you know if I'm still employed 😉

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I can't say whether it's better or worse for anyone, but I can share with you how our system is set up. On all accounts but Facebook, we have just one brand-level account for OSF HealthCare. In a couple spots, we have a separate channel for our innovation team because their audience and goals don't align with the audience for most of our content, but by and large, everyone benefits most from the collective audience of the singular channel.

With Facebook, however, we have one channel at the brand level, one for each of our branded service lines (three total, including our children's hospital) and one for each community hospital. We've found that people in each community tend to think of their local hospital as the system itself, even in the city that hosts our headquarters – it's not OSF HealthCare, it's "Saint Francis." These are the channels we use for market-specific paid ads or events functionality as well.

The only way we're really able to maintain those accounts (14 locations) is by having marketing representatives on the ground at each hospital who can find local content and post regularly. Without the team providing that regular stream of hyperlocal content, the channels' existence would be hard to justify resourcing. For each of these folks, this is only a small part of their job, so while we rely on them for regular social media content, they're also our boots on the ground for almost every marketing initiative launching in their market. Hope that helps!

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Hello! At TriHealth in Cincinnati, we have 5 major hospital locations and about 150 practice locations. We have one main corporate account for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube, which is run by our social media specialist, @jesslewis422, but we do have a couple of other areas of presence, like our nursing college and orthopedic service line have their own Facebook pages. We have recently been encouraging practice locations to create pages to connect to their patients. However, these pages are run by the people at these locations or in those service lines. To me the biggest question is how much content is there to share for various locations/service lines, and who is going to manage these accounts? Jess doesn't have the capacity to manage all of those accounts, so if they have enough content and are able to manage a page, it can be nice for a patient to connect to a specific place or service they used.

Also, all of these accounts must somehow be linked to our corporate account and we have the account information in case we need to remove something or edit a post.

I'm actually focused on our employee Facebook and Twitter pages, which is just a part of my overall internal communications position. We now have a closed Nursing Facebook group, but for the most part we're trying to keep our employee messaging centralized. Thus far no one has been able to justify more pages.

All in all, I don't think there is a "right" way to do it. If your community is tied to a particular hospital and that location has the content and means to support it, I think it can be beneficial and increase overall brand engagement. Just as long as those running the accounts are trained and will make sure the page is tended to.

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Hey everyone!

As my colleague @_jennshafer said, we do have some service lines and departments that have their own Facebook pages outside of the main corporate one. The question remains the same — is there enough content to justify a separate page? I help them with initial set-up and with guidelines. They are also required to add the corporate account as an admin on those pages.

Some of our hospitals do have individual pages that were set up before I took over my current position, and so now those are set up as "child" pages to the main page — anything I post there gets pushed through.

Really though, if the content and engagement is there to support a separate page for each location, then by all means, go for it! But if not, then I would say if you'd like that page to have a presence for the purpose of check-ins and/or reviews, then setting it up as a "child" page through the Facebook Business Manager is the way to go.

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@jesslewis422

Hey everyone!

As my colleague @_jennshafer said, we do have some service lines and departments that have their own Facebook pages outside of the main corporate one. The question remains the same — is there enough content to justify a separate page? I help them with initial set-up and with guidelines. They are also required to add the corporate account as an admin on those pages.

Some of our hospitals do have individual pages that were set up before I took over my current position, and so now those are set up as "child" pages to the main page — anything I post there gets pushed through.

Really though, if the content and engagement is there to support a separate page for each location, then by all means, go for it! But if not, then I would say if you'd like that page to have a presence for the purpose of check-ins and/or reviews, then setting it up as a "child" page through the Facebook Business Manager is the way to go.

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Hey Jess! I'm wrangling in some Pages now and I just looked at your Page and location Pages. I noticed not every primary Page post gets shared on your locations. Do you select one post per day? How do you determine what goes out to everything and what stays on your primary Page? Do you ever publish a post to only a location?

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@audreylaine

Hey Jess! I'm wrangling in some Pages now and I just looked at your Page and location Pages. I noticed not every primary Page post gets shared on your locations. Do you select one post per day? How do you determine what goes out to everything and what stays on your primary Page? Do you ever publish a post to only a location?

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Hey Audrey Laine! I'm glad you pointed that out to me because it actually made me realize that the Locations tab on our main page is what's not set up correctly for some reason! To answer your question, most of our main locations (Bethesda North Hospital, Good Samaritan Hospital, TriHealth Good Samaritan Western Ridge, and few others) are set up as child pages, and when I post to our main page, those posts do feed through automatically. So, most posts go out to everything. I typically don't publish a post to just one location. We do have some locations that have their own social media pages, but those pages have a dedicated person on-site for managing those accounts. I hope that answers your question!

Now, to get that Locations tab fixed…ha!

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