Discussions

Monitoring Comments on Social

Posted by Alli Colasacco @amcs23, Wed, Jan 15 9:52am

Does anyone have a social policy surrounding comment monitoring on their social platforms?

Obviously, health care orgs are often targeted with negative comments. How do you determine what should be deleted and what is kept? If anyone has clarity on how they decide, please share! Of course, we keep HIPPA in mind but someone they are completely random comments.

I am about 4 months into my time at my organization and I am trying to provide more clarity and structure to removing comments or keeping them on posts, and there are differing opinions among some folks so I'd like to put some rules into place.

Thank you!

Hi Alli! Attached is a smartinsight.com flow chart that we use at INTEGRIS to illustrate our procedures. Of course every situation is different so approaches can change on a situational basis. But this is a good route to start.

Shared files

Social Media Guide V2[1] (Social-Media-Guide-V21.pdf)

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@SarahJohnston

Hi Alli! Attached is a smartinsight.com flow chart that we use at INTEGRIS to illustrate our procedures. Of course every situation is different so approaches can change on a situational basis. But this is a good route to start.

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This is extremely helpful – thank you so much for providing!

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Very nice decision tree. I would add one other. Is the comment libel?

I think if an employee is a subject of libel, then both the employee and legal should be informed, especially since the comment is being published on the employer’s digital platform.

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@matthewrehrl

Very nice decision tree. I would add one other. Is the comment libel?

I think if an employee is a subject of libel, then both the employee and legal should be informed, especially since the comment is being published on the employer’s digital platform.

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Great insight – I'll make sure to note that as well. Thanks!

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@SarahJohnston

Hi Alli! Attached is a smartinsight.com flow chart that we use at INTEGRIS to illustrate our procedures. Of course every situation is different so approaches can change on a situational basis. But this is a good route to start.

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I appreciate this decision tree as well! This is very similar to how we would advise engaging in comments. I like this layout!

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Interesting discussion here. It makes me wonder something….

As I have been trying to reengage on Twitter I have noticed how much complaining is done there by individuals in the medical profession.

Does anyone watch for this on an organizational basis for negative comments? Or do you just watch the other platforms and only for comments from the outside public?

Mostly just curious.

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@SarahJohnston

Hi Alli! Attached is a smartinsight.com flow chart that we use at INTEGRIS to illustrate our procedures. Of course every situation is different so approaches can change on a situational basis. But this is a good route to start.

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I love a good flow chart with making decisions! This is actually such an interesting approach. Thanks for sharing.

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@IndianaScott – sometimes I am absolutely stunned by some of the comments on social media. They are so negative, and potentially career-ending.

One new area of concern is Tik-Tok which I seen used by healthcare folks to make fun of patients.

This is why I am such a strong advocate of having 3 missions written out: employer, career, and personal and consider to what extent they do and don’t overlap before creating content- and thinking how the content appears in these three contexts. But it is never right to mock people, and complaining is also generally a very bad idea too.

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I like the flow chart and it aligns with our policy and protocol. We hide comments if users are saying negative things to each other and/or calling out providers by name. When the conversations gets heated around hot topics, say, vaccines or breastfeeding, we typically monitor and let it play out. We also hide if people share personal information or if it seems spammy.

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Thanks for the flow chart and for the additional comments here. As an individual on Twitter I follow your "misguided "branch when folks comment or post with unsubstantiated claims regarding miracle cancer treatments.

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@IndianaScott

Interesting discussion here. It makes me wonder something….

As I have been trying to reengage on Twitter I have noticed how much complaining is done there by individuals in the medical profession.

Does anyone watch for this on an organizational basis for negative comments? Or do you just watch the other platforms and only for comments from the outside public?

Mostly just curious.

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@IndianaScott I echo your observations completely. It is mind blowing how people can blast others on social media and not think about consequences. We watch for it at INTEGRIS, both internally and externally. For internal issues: I have a specific contact person in HR I notify if I receive or discover inappropriate posts by an employee. Depending on the situation, some are taken care of by the management, and some posts have resulted in termination.

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@IndianaScott yes, we monitor for those, but we typically only respond if the employee has tagged us or if there is a pretty simple response we can offer (like sending someone a link with more information). And if the comment is a violation of hospital policy (usually images/video that include patients), we send it to Human Resources.

@matthewrehrl, are there any good tools or tips for TikTok monitoring?

Related question — I posted this a couple of weeks ago but didn't get a response. What do you do with comments on your Facebook page/posts that reference minor patients? I.e., "my son sees a developmental pediatrician there." We leave these comments up because parents typically have the authority to disclose their child's health info, but I'm not sure if that's always the case.

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