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Is Your Organization Posting During #BlackOutTuesday?

Posted by jcattel @jcattel, Tue, Jun 2 7:43am

Hi All! I'm interested to hear how organizations are handling social posting during #BlackOutTuesday and #AmplifyMelanatedVoices (links below to explain each hashtag). Are you posting at all?

At Connecticut Children's, we just posted a blog about discussing racial inequality and social justice with kids (https://www.connecticutchildrens.org/developmental-pediatrics/discussing-racial-inequality-and-social-justice-with-children/). We'll be posting that on social today, but otherwise likely taking a break for a bit.

#BlackOutTuesday: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/blackout-tuesday-instagram-black-squares-how-to-post-box-a9543896.html
#AmplifyMelanatedVoices: https://www.instagram.com/p/CA3vVPiJebI/

I'm glad you asked this question — I am generally interested in what organizations are posting right now too (perhaps this belongs in a separate thread, but I'm surprised I don't see one). We are a non-profit membership organization devoted to secure interoperable health exchange, so trying to figure out where/how we can appropriately contribute to the conversation. One consideration we had was whether our CEO should post something, and then our official account share/retweet it.

To your original question, I would love to participate in #BlackOutTuesday — we have a Summit in one week and I feel we have to post today to meet sponsor agreements and expectations. I think the content you selected is thoughtful and appropriate for today.

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We are not. We ran this statement yesterday: https://www.checkupnewsroom.com/official-statement-from-cook-childrens-regarding-racial-bias/
Tomorrow, we have a powerful post from two of our doctors about race and the impact that it's had on them as women of color.
We are also working on a story, focusing on the impact of race and children, as regard to ACEs.

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We didn't. We had this one post this morning on FB, IG, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and then had no content the rest of the day. https://twitter.com/Nemours/status/1267818262647070722

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Our digital team opted to go silent on all accounts yesterday as we did not have prepared content to contribute to amplifying Black voices. We're working on that content now with our System leadership. A bit behind the eight ball, but hoping to have statements approved today and working on articles similar to Connecticut Children's with our provider team.

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As a retired marketer, I have been finding the range of business actions for #blackouttuesday interesting. Let me say upfront I worked for a Fortune 500 corporation with its mission as "to address society's major unmet needs as profitable opportunities" so we had a different take on our work than most.

I applaud all organizations that are posting in support of creating a more equal society in America in whatever form they find best. I have been surprised by the companies who have chosen, instead, to say something along the lines of 'we don't discuss political issues on our site'. To me silence = consent to the status quo. Not that any corporation has to wade into the issue of protesting and rioting, but the issue here is the unjust murder of George Floyd at the hands of those who were sworn to 'protect and serve'.

As always, just my two cents, plain.

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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I think since public health issues are within the wheelhouse of most health organizations, and since there are clear racial inequities within public health, its not only appropriate but it may be necessary to comment what they are doing to address these racial disparities. A good recent reference is the AAFP (American Academy of Family Physicians) statement from May 31: https://www.aafp.org/media-center/releases-statements/all/2020/aafp-condemns-all-forms-of-racism.html

But what should we do as individuals? I believe as citizens it is also essential we weigh in, but whether or not the best way to do that is through social media requires a more nuanced answer. To what extent is any given post helping us move towards a more just society and a more equitable society versus to what extent are we adding to the noise and increasing to instability, or simply signalling our virtue?

For me personally, I believe the best way for me to effect change as a citizen is through informed voting and careful selection of donations, and I tend to use social media politically to mostly listen and learn from people better informed than me. Sometimes the best use of social media is to listen and effect change in oneself.

However, If/when I do weigh in on social injustice issues, its more likely to do directyl with public health..

For example, I am quite worried about the high CoVid mortality in both obesity and the minority communities, and how these overlap each other. Part of this also ties into such things as physiological differences abdominal obesity and peripheral obesity. That's why I cringe when i see so many protestors without masks, or (and even with masks and not social distancing); they may be inadvertently putting their own parents and grandparents at increased risk of death. (Keep in mind as of today we have "only" 106,000 deaths as of June 3. By the end of the year, is it going to be 150,000? 200,000? 500,000?). I bring this up because most organizations and most individuals can help our most vulnerable communities by strongly reminding all potential protestors of the need to employ meticulous mask wearing and social distancing.

So if you are responsible for social media within a healthcare organization and the powers that be are hesitant to come out directly about BLM, at least consider doubling down on Covid19 prevention and precautions during the next two weeks because you may be actually saving lives 4 weeks from now.

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Since we posted our statement, our CEO sent an email today saying he had received messages from employees saying how thankful they are to work at a place where we spoke up. We have also received several emails from employees thanking us. Today, we posted this article on our social media:
https://www.checkupnewsroom.com/i-want-my-son-to-come-home-alive-two-pediatricians-share-their-personal-experiences-with-race-in-america/

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@JeffCalaway

Since we posted our statement, our CEO sent an email today saying he had received messages from employees saying how thankful they are to work at a place where we spoke up. We have also received several emails from employees thanking us. Today, we posted this article on our social media:
https://www.checkupnewsroom.com/i-want-my-son-to-come-home-alive-two-pediatricians-share-their-personal-experiences-with-race-in-america/

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You bring up the excellent example of the CEO/Board needs to take the lead, both internally and externally.

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Thanks everyone for sharing! I really appreciate it!

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I appreciate this conversation & everyone sharing what they have been doing. I am curious if anyone is pausing their social content for the rest of the week or doing anything to amplify black voices in healthcare.

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We paused posting yesterday, and we are being very intentional with what we post for the remainder of the week. We've determined that for the next few days content must fall into the buckets of: furthering discussion around racial inequality and social justice OR urgent information about operations resumption.

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@cemge21

I appreciate this conversation & everyone sharing what they have been doing. I am curious if anyone is pausing their social content for the rest of the week or doing anything to amplify black voices in healthcare.

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We don't need to look too far.

A good starting point would by listening and learning from our own @drjrmarcelin and her recent talk on racial disparities within healthcare regarding CoVid19 from a moring grand round she did a lifetime (2 weeks) ago)
https://echo360.org/media/e68b060c-3986-4e9c-b6d0-29b2a7f6f86e/public
It will (hopefully) make many of us feel uncomfortable, and, although she talks a fair amount about Nebraska, it applies pretty much everywhere.

Incidently this is a talk from someone who has the confluence of two areas of expertise and passion: infectious disease and racial inequity.

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@matthewrehrl

We don't need to look too far.

A good starting point would by listening and learning from our own @drjrmarcelin and her recent talk on racial disparities within healthcare regarding CoVid19 from a moring grand round she did a lifetime (2 weeks) ago)
https://echo360.org/media/e68b060c-3986-4e9c-b6d0-29b2a7f6f86e/public
It will (hopefully) make many of us feel uncomfortable, and, although she talks a fair amount about Nebraska, it applies pretty much everywhere.

Incidently this is a talk from someone who has the confluence of two areas of expertise and passion: infectious disease and racial inequity.

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@matthewrehrl thanks for the shoutout, which I am just seeing now as I have been behind on a lot of things due to the two pandemics. I appreciate you linking the grand rounds, and of course saddened that the numbers are so much worse today than they were back in May. I think the most important thing for organizations is to not stop talking about racism and inequity in healthcare – silence is not an option, but neither is memefication. As a member of the Black community and a physician in this community, I want to see ongoing action more than empty pledges, random moments of silence, or hashtags. Thanks to all of you out there who are urging your organizations to move from words to action!

Liked by Matthew Rehrl

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