Discussions

Epic EHR Transition

Posted by Abby Stonebreaker @astonebreaker, May 17, 2017

Good morning!

We’re just beginning our EHR transition process to Epic/Lawson. I’d love some feedback on how other organizations have handled this change via social channels. Any tips, things that worked well, things that didn’t work?

Thanks,
Abby

Hi @astonebreaker. Epic is a huge step! Good idea to be considering the opportunity to use social channels to educate and share. I’ll tag a few people who may be able to help with this question. Not sure if they all are using Epic, but hope they can help with the concept whichever platform they’re using. @MeganRowe @VickiBencken @cynthiamanley @cabbotts @kevinfonger

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Say more about your question or concern…

We migrate in early November. We are not planning to use social media channels proactively to communicate specifically about our EPIC migration because those channels reach beyond our patient population. With our patients, we are trying to keep our communication simple and really focused on what truly impacts the patient. Our EPIC consultants tell us that there is a tendency to want to share too much information with patients — they don’t care about our work flow or processes. “Just tell me what I need to know and what, if anything, I need to do.” For us, the fact that we have an EMR isn’t new — we built our own ages ago. Our approach is direct-to-patient communications about what changes or doesn’t, and the benefits that actually matter to them.

The social media team – along with our media relations/corp comms peers — are restricted from taking PTO during the migration, primarily as a precaution in case it becomes an issues management concern. Fingers crossed that it goes smoothly and we are not needed.

I am curious your organization’s thinking behind this.

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@cynthiamanley

Say more about your question or concern…

We migrate in early November. We are not planning to use social media channels proactively to communicate specifically about our EPIC migration because those channels reach beyond our patient population. With our patients, we are trying to keep our communication simple and really focused on what truly impacts the patient. Our EPIC consultants tell us that there is a tendency to want to share too much information with patients — they don’t care about our work flow or processes. “Just tell me what I need to know and what, if anything, I need to do.” For us, the fact that we have an EMR isn’t new — we built our own ages ago. Our approach is direct-to-patient communications about what changes or doesn’t, and the benefits that actually matter to them.

The social media team – along with our media relations/corp comms peers — are restricted from taking PTO during the migration, primarily as a precaution in case it becomes an issues management concern. Fingers crossed that it goes smoothly and we are not needed.

I am curious your organization’s thinking behind this.

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Thanks for these ideas, @cynthiamanley. I’m a bit concerned about the PTO restriction during migration. One implementation I’m aware of seemed to take months to iron out all the wrinkles. Hope yours goes quickly!

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This is good timing, because our organization is rolling out “Epic Phase 2.” I totally agree about the tendency to overshare, and at the same time I’m fighting some internal panic over “let’s wait until everything’s running smoothly to say anything publicly.” On one hand I’m tempted to bow to that because our Facebook page can’t become the technical support place — I don’t even have EMR access (and don’t want it) so the best I can do is give people our support number. On the other hand, in my experience when we’ve shared things with the message of “We’re making this big change and we’re sorry if you see delays, but here are the good changes you’ll ultimately notice” we get very good responses.

So, while I don’t know yet exactly what I’ll be saying, we do plan to develop some messaging around the two or three changes patients will notice and share that through social channels. I’m also planning to highlight some of the IT people behind the scenes through our weekly TeamTuesday posts.

We also have a PTO restriction, although my manager is making some exceptions since she doesn’t anticipate a major impact on our team. It’s tough because some people won’t be able to take summer vacations, and I’m as concerned about the impact on clinicians (and the possibility of public complaining) as I am the messaging.

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@MeganRowe

This is good timing, because our organization is rolling out “Epic Phase 2.” I totally agree about the tendency to overshare, and at the same time I’m fighting some internal panic over “let’s wait until everything’s running smoothly to say anything publicly.” On one hand I’m tempted to bow to that because our Facebook page can’t become the technical support place — I don’t even have EMR access (and don’t want it) so the best I can do is give people our support number. On the other hand, in my experience when we’ve shared things with the message of “We’re making this big change and we’re sorry if you see delays, but here are the good changes you’ll ultimately notice” we get very good responses.

So, while I don’t know yet exactly what I’ll be saying, we do plan to develop some messaging around the two or three changes patients will notice and share that through social channels. I’m also planning to highlight some of the IT people behind the scenes through our weekly TeamTuesday posts.

We also have a PTO restriction, although my manager is making some exceptions since she doesn’t anticipate a major impact on our team. It’s tough because some people won’t be able to take summer vacations, and I’m as concerned about the impact on clinicians (and the possibility of public complaining) as I am the messaging.

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Totally agree on the griping by docs and staff. We are doing a ton of training with our people and emphasizing that sharing with patients things like “our entire process has changed,” or “they have changed everything and I can’t find/do/etc” is more of a concern.

We plan to have a bank of responses for social media if we get questions or see concerns/complaints. There are so many of us going through this — it will be interesting to see the different approaches.

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@MeganRowe

This is good timing, because our organization is rolling out “Epic Phase 2.” I totally agree about the tendency to overshare, and at the same time I’m fighting some internal panic over “let’s wait until everything’s running smoothly to say anything publicly.” On one hand I’m tempted to bow to that because our Facebook page can’t become the technical support place — I don’t even have EMR access (and don’t want it) so the best I can do is give people our support number. On the other hand, in my experience when we’ve shared things with the message of “We’re making this big change and we’re sorry if you see delays, but here are the good changes you’ll ultimately notice” we get very good responses.

So, while I don’t know yet exactly what I’ll be saying, we do plan to develop some messaging around the two or three changes patients will notice and share that through social channels. I’m also planning to highlight some of the IT people behind the scenes through our weekly TeamTuesday posts.

We also have a PTO restriction, although my manager is making some exceptions since she doesn’t anticipate a major impact on our team. It’s tough because some people won’t be able to take summer vacations, and I’m as concerned about the impact on clinicians (and the possibility of public complaining) as I am the messaging.

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Thank you for sharing! For your EPIC Phase 1 rollout, did you have messaging prepared for social channels? If so, did you use it?

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@MeganRowe

This is good timing, because our organization is rolling out “Epic Phase 2.” I totally agree about the tendency to overshare, and at the same time I’m fighting some internal panic over “let’s wait until everything’s running smoothly to say anything publicly.” On one hand I’m tempted to bow to that because our Facebook page can’t become the technical support place — I don’t even have EMR access (and don’t want it) so the best I can do is give people our support number. On the other hand, in my experience when we’ve shared things with the message of “We’re making this big change and we’re sorry if you see delays, but here are the good changes you’ll ultimately notice” we get very good responses.

So, while I don’t know yet exactly what I’ll be saying, we do plan to develop some messaging around the two or three changes patients will notice and share that through social channels. I’m also planning to highlight some of the IT people behind the scenes through our weekly TeamTuesday posts.

We also have a PTO restriction, although my manager is making some exceptions since she doesn’t anticipate a major impact on our team. It’s tough because some people won’t be able to take summer vacations, and I’m as concerned about the impact on clinicians (and the possibility of public complaining) as I am the messaging.

Jump to this post

I think Phase 1 was 2009 or so, and it actually pre-dated our Facebook account by a year or so. It might have even pre-dated our Twitter account, but if we did have Twitter, it was VERY low on the communications radar and priority in the first year or two, so no, no Epic-specific messaging.

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@MeganRowe

This is good timing, because our organization is rolling out “Epic Phase 2.” I totally agree about the tendency to overshare, and at the same time I’m fighting some internal panic over “let’s wait until everything’s running smoothly to say anything publicly.” On one hand I’m tempted to bow to that because our Facebook page can’t become the technical support place — I don’t even have EMR access (and don’t want it) so the best I can do is give people our support number. On the other hand, in my experience when we’ve shared things with the message of “We’re making this big change and we’re sorry if you see delays, but here are the good changes you’ll ultimately notice” we get very good responses.

So, while I don’t know yet exactly what I’ll be saying, we do plan to develop some messaging around the two or three changes patients will notice and share that through social channels. I’m also planning to highlight some of the IT people behind the scenes through our weekly TeamTuesday posts.

We also have a PTO restriction, although my manager is making some exceptions since she doesn’t anticipate a major impact on our team. It’s tough because some people won’t be able to take summer vacations, and I’m as concerned about the impact on clinicians (and the possibility of public complaining) as I am the messaging.

Jump to this post

Love the concept of highlighting IT members as you go through the transition! I agree with you – I’ve seen some great success within our social channels when sharing information regarding delays, outages, or changes that will be coming.

Our current PHR system is very outdated and doesn’t provide a comprehensive view for the patient. I’m excited to showcase MyChart to our patients, but am trying not to be *too* eager.

We’re having a few follow-up meetings in the next month or so to discuss how SM plays into the whole package.

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@cynthiamanley

Say more about your question or concern…

We migrate in early November. We are not planning to use social media channels proactively to communicate specifically about our EPIC migration because those channels reach beyond our patient population. With our patients, we are trying to keep our communication simple and really focused on what truly impacts the patient. Our EPIC consultants tell us that there is a tendency to want to share too much information with patients — they don’t care about our work flow or processes. “Just tell me what I need to know and what, if anything, I need to do.” For us, the fact that we have an EMR isn’t new — we built our own ages ago. Our approach is direct-to-patient communications about what changes or doesn’t, and the benefits that actually matter to them.

The social media team – along with our media relations/corp comms peers — are restricted from taking PTO during the migration, primarily as a precaution in case it becomes an issues management concern. Fingers crossed that it goes smoothly and we are not needed.

I am curious your organization’s thinking behind this.

Jump to this post

You make a very good point, Cynthia.

After spending a considerable amount thinking about this, I’m seeing two potential uses for SM:

1. Share information regarding any immediate changes that could potentially impact the way they receive care. I thought that even though there may be more than just direct patients on our SM channels, it would also keep our advocates and employees informed (among other communication channels, of course).
2. Monitor heavily for patient or employee complaints on SM. Be sure to address these directly and quickly, with prepared responses that highlight *why* these issues are happening, and the importance of these changes. It may not change their mind, but it will let everyone else know that we’re on top of it, and the outcome will be worth the temporary hiccups.

We currently have some extremely segmented and outdated systems that will be infinitely improved with Epic. I truly think that our patients, employees, and associates will be able to tell the difference in their care once the conversion is complete and the bumps are all ironed out.

Am I being too optimistic?

We also have PTO restrictions. I’m hoping we’re not needed to that extent, either, but we shall see.

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What are people doing to include SO/GI data and are physicians asking these questions from patients to collect data in the EHR?

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