Discussions

Disclaimers on Videos?

Posted by Katherine L. Kraines @klkraines, Wed, Oct 2 10:59am

We are doing three educational videos about our vent weaning program to inform familes about the process. Does anyone add disclaimers to their videos about only being for educational purposes and not medical advice – this will be on YouTube, our website, FB, etc. In looking around I'm not seeing other hospitals so this but am wondering about best practices. I am find that compliance, risk management and possible legal advice to be quite variable on this topic. And I've head that putting up a disclaimer can actually make it feel less reliable to people watching the video? All thoughts are welcome!

I think videos are a great way to educate family’s in what to expect, but I’m curious why are you using so social media rather than making private videos available in the ICU where families can then ask questions privately and immediately? I mention this because the ICU, if that’s what you are talking about, is one of the mostly highly charged emotional parts of a hospital, where there are occasional bad outcomes, and it’s not one I typically associate with
Patient-centric Social Media.

Now, a typical “This is what is expected in surgery – showing the highly organized flow behind the scenes of a typical day surgery – that could be a pretty sweet video for marketing purposes and really relieve som3 patient anxiety….

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Hi Matt,
Thanks for the response! We are an LTACH and have a vent weaning program with two tracks – we can wean you or if that doesn't work we work with the family to potentially take the patient home on a vent which is a huge decision. The videos are part of the educational process. I don't think that we would use these on FB, etc., but will be using them on YouTube and our website. They will also be on our reps ipads when they meet with the family in the ICU. We created them as part o our educational program – for the very reason you noted. This is a challenging and emotionally charged issue and we find that families don't retain information well, sometimes no matter how often we share it with them verbally. Our goal was to have these available for them to access repeatedly as needed for additional information and to offer another learning venue.

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Educational use for home management – that's pretty innovative ( and I think as you track results would be valuable to publish or present at conferences! )

I do have a couple of thoughts. I would consider making the videos semiprivate rather than public on YouTube; I would also disable comments so there is no confusion that real-time questions can't and won't be answered on the social media platform

I am no lawyer, but I suspect the real risk is in making sure the content is rock solid, particularly in terms of emergencies.

I suspect your videos and program have been created with the input of some really bright pulmonologists and respiratory techs. However, what I would consider before releasing the videos into the wild, is getting a Red Team together of people not involved with the program whose sole purpose is to look for critical mistakes. ( Before med school I was an engineer in the defense industry working in missile programs, and before any crucial test we would bring engineers outside of the program in to beat the heck out of everything!) . Your organization likely contracts to a Malpractice Insurer – so I think having one of their attorneys or paralegals sit on a Red Team would be invaluable simply for prevention purposes.

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Hi Katherine. I follow several types of healthcare social media channels whether its a clinic themselves or a doctor (social media influencer as well). I know a disclaimer within the actual description box is used in many cases for those kinds of videos. If you do that, you can always add a small comment in the corner of a video with "disclaimer: For education purposes only. Go to the description box for more information."

That is just an avenue I've seen used a lot from different healthcare and non-healthcare outlets on Youtube.

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We may have gotten creative once with a CPR video demonstration. Haha.

"Did you know when a person has a cardiac arrest, CPR can triple the chance of survival? This National CPR Week, Nathan is here to provide a quick preview of what to expect from hands-only CPR training. Get trained today, and be prepared to save a life tomorrow!" (Even with the "quick preview" disclaimer, we still had a couple people joke in the Comments asking if they could get their certificate after watching the video)

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@matthewrehrl

Educational use for home management – that's pretty innovative ( and I think as you track results would be valuable to publish or present at conferences! )

I do have a couple of thoughts. I would consider making the videos semiprivate rather than public on YouTube; I would also disable comments so there is no confusion that real-time questions can't and won't be answered on the social media platform

I am no lawyer, but I suspect the real risk is in making sure the content is rock solid, particularly in terms of emergencies.

I suspect your videos and program have been created with the input of some really bright pulmonologists and respiratory techs. However, what I would consider before releasing the videos into the wild, is getting a Red Team together of people not involved with the program whose sole purpose is to look for critical mistakes. ( Before med school I was an engineer in the defense industry working in missile programs, and before any crucial test we would bring engineers outside of the program in to beat the heck out of everything!) . Your organization likely contracts to a Malpractice Insurer – so I think having one of their attorneys or paralegals sit on a Red Team would be invaluable simply for prevention purposes.

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Hi Matt,
Yes, we did have medical experts create it and write the script as well as being the presenters of the information so we are feeling quite solid on that end. But I do appreciate the caveat of being sure that is the case. Greatly appreciate the thoughts and feedback on this issue.

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@lynkeren

Hi Katherine. I follow several types of healthcare social media channels whether its a clinic themselves or a doctor (social media influencer as well). I know a disclaimer within the actual description box is used in many cases for those kinds of videos. If you do that, you can always add a small comment in the corner of a video with "disclaimer: For education purposes only. Go to the description box for more information."

That is just an avenue I've seen used a lot from different healthcare and non-healthcare outlets on Youtube.

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Hi Lyn,
That is super. That is what we were thinking of. Interestingly, I ran this same question by a group of other hospital folks in our state and one person suggested that putting the disclaimer up actually makes people think it is less reputable information. Not sure that I totally agree with that. And he suggested that the disclaimer might not be as effective legally as we might think. This is all giving me good things to ponder.

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@andrewmcglothlen

We may have gotten creative once with a CPR video demonstration. Haha.

"Did you know when a person has a cardiac arrest, CPR can triple the chance of survival? This National CPR Week, Nathan is here to provide a quick preview of what to expect from hands-only CPR training. Get trained today, and be prepared to save a life tomorrow!" (Even with the "quick preview" disclaimer, we still had a couple people joke in the Comments asking if they could get their certificate after watching the video)

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Hi Matt, go figure. I think there is no way to cover all bases but it seems prudent to at least prep people to watch but not unquestioningly "do" or apply what they see!

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@klkraines

Hi Lyn,
That is super. That is what we were thinking of. Interestingly, I ran this same question by a group of other hospital folks in our state and one person suggested that putting the disclaimer up actually makes people think it is less reputable information. Not sure that I totally agree with that. And he suggested that the disclaimer might not be as effective legally as we might think. This is all giving me good things to ponder.

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Hi Katherine,
That is interesting. With my interpretation, it is just a legal disclaimer to make sure you aren't liable for anything that could come out of it. I would say most reasonable people should see it as a normal act for an organization. Those who don't, might not see that at all no matter the organization or platform.

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