Discussions

Career posts on Facebook

Posted by Rhonda Mann @rhondamann, Apr 8, 2018

Hi all – How do you manage your job postings through social? Do you use only Linkedin? Have a special Facebook page just for careers? Do occasional posts on your regular channels? Thanks, much! -Rhonda Tufts Medical Center, Boston

What a great question – its a nut I was never able to crack, but did spend a lot of time on it in regards to Physical and Advanced Care Practioner Recruiting.

Most healthcare organizations don’t do a great job at online recruiting. I think there are a few reasons.

First Marketing often controls most of the social media channels (except LInkedIn, which is usually controlled by HR). Second the website’s gatekeeper, which is place that all recruits which eventually engage with , is going to be controlled by IT/WEB Design folks, and is usually seen as static within healthcare, rather than dynamic, something that should change. Third, there is a huge push (driven by admin) to get possible future employees in a database as soon as possible.

The best analogy I can think of is going to a car dealership to but a car, but all the cars are hidden in the back lot. you first have to do a google search for the car you think you may want in the salesman office, then you have to to fill out your loan application before even actually seeing or test driving them.

Fourth, there is also the question of whether or not to recruit Physicians and Nurses Practitioners separately from other staff, with their own devoted flow and application process. ( At an academic institution this would be standard) There is a bureaucratic advantage to treat every one the same, but then again, an average physician generated 1 million + dollars of revenue a year for 10 years, so should they be approached differently?

Anyway, I could drone on for a while, (( I have eek!! )) but regards how to approach online recruiting/staffing here is a reasonable approach.

1. Define clearly what makes you unique, particularly from any other, closely located, high quality institutions ( hint – its not your 401k…)

2.Take a hard look at the flow of your webpage first. Does it show your uniqueness? Is it designed for the applicant, or is it designed for your IT Department? Is there a very clear call to action – (ie call us, send a resume, fill out a profile). Do you use embedded videos( these are golden because they SHOW culture. How friendly is your jobs search engine ( yours is pretty good)

3. Do you have dedicated Twitter account for jobs or careers? Twitter is light weight, its friendly for reposting and scheduling, its quite visual for location, and, in theory a Twitter widget could be placed on your recruiting page making your recruiting page quite dynamic.

4.If you have a LinkedIn site, is it current and showing all of your openings ( most aren’t) and are you taking advantage of its video options ( most don’t). Does it clearly lead an applicant you your website.

5.Other than a link, I wouldn’t spend too much time On Facebook at least for directly recruiting or recruiting physicians or NPs, but I do think it is a great place to generally show culture. When we are in job search mode, we will go to website first.

Take a look Kiaser Permenante (https://www.kaiserpermanentejobs.org/?kp_shortcut_referrer=kp.org/careers) which I think does a good job.

At Tufts you have is a very nice introductory video on the webpage with over a thousand views, and your openings are easy to find, but have you made enough of a sale to get someone to fill out an application? What about the location? Where do people live? It would be interesting to track page visits, video views and daily applications to get a sense of page effectiveness. (Taker a look at Google Careers to see how they use video https://careers.google.com) . How about a several inexpensive 'Day in the life' videos? A graph showing gender diversity? A map showing where employees live? Anything special, such as your relationship to the university?

REPLY
@matthewrehrl

What a great question – its a nut I was never able to crack, but did spend a lot of time on it in regards to Physical and Advanced Care Practioner Recruiting.

Most healthcare organizations don’t do a great job at online recruiting. I think there are a few reasons.

First Marketing often controls most of the social media channels (except LInkedIn, which is usually controlled by HR). Second the website’s gatekeeper, which is place that all recruits which eventually engage with , is going to be controlled by IT/WEB Design folks, and is usually seen as static within healthcare, rather than dynamic, something that should change. Third, there is a huge push (driven by admin) to get possible future employees in a database as soon as possible.

The best analogy I can think of is going to a car dealership to but a car, but all the cars are hidden in the back lot. you first have to do a google search for the car you think you may want in the salesman office, then you have to to fill out your loan application before even actually seeing or test driving them.

Fourth, there is also the question of whether or not to recruit Physicians and Nurses Practitioners separately from other staff, with their own devoted flow and application process. ( At an academic institution this would be standard) There is a bureaucratic advantage to treat every one the same, but then again, an average physician generated 1 million + dollars of revenue a year for 10 years, so should they be approached differently?

Anyway, I could drone on for a while, (( I have eek!! )) but regards how to approach online recruiting/staffing here is a reasonable approach.

1. Define clearly what makes you unique, particularly from any other, closely located, high quality institutions ( hint – its not your 401k…)

2.Take a hard look at the flow of your webpage first. Does it show your uniqueness? Is it designed for the applicant, or is it designed for your IT Department? Is there a very clear call to action – (ie call us, send a resume, fill out a profile). Do you use embedded videos( these are golden because they SHOW culture. How friendly is your jobs search engine ( yours is pretty good)

3. Do you have dedicated Twitter account for jobs or careers? Twitter is light weight, its friendly for reposting and scheduling, its quite visual for location, and, in theory a Twitter widget could be placed on your recruiting page making your recruiting page quite dynamic.

4.If you have a LinkedIn site, is it current and showing all of your openings ( most aren’t) and are you taking advantage of its video options ( most don’t). Does it clearly lead an applicant you your website.

5.Other than a link, I wouldn’t spend too much time On Facebook at least for directly recruiting or recruiting physicians or NPs, but I do think it is a great place to generally show culture. When we are in job search mode, we will go to website first.

Take a look Kiaser Permenante (https://www.kaiserpermanentejobs.org/?kp_shortcut_referrer=kp.org/careers) which I think does a good job.

At Tufts you have is a very nice introductory video on the webpage with over a thousand views, and your openings are easy to find, but have you made enough of a sale to get someone to fill out an application? What about the location? Where do people live? It would be interesting to track page visits, video views and daily applications to get a sense of page effectiveness. (Taker a look at Google Careers to see how they use video https://careers.google.com) . How about a several inexpensive 'Day in the life' videos? A graph showing gender diversity? A map showing where employees live? Anything special, such as your relationship to the university?

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I'm slow to respond here, but thanks a bunch @matthewrehrl for such a thorough response. Always value your strategic thinking!

REPLY
@matthewrehrl

What a great question – its a nut I was never able to crack, but did spend a lot of time on it in regards to Physical and Advanced Care Practioner Recruiting.

Most healthcare organizations don’t do a great job at online recruiting. I think there are a few reasons.

First Marketing often controls most of the social media channels (except LInkedIn, which is usually controlled by HR). Second the website’s gatekeeper, which is place that all recruits which eventually engage with , is going to be controlled by IT/WEB Design folks, and is usually seen as static within healthcare, rather than dynamic, something that should change. Third, there is a huge push (driven by admin) to get possible future employees in a database as soon as possible.

The best analogy I can think of is going to a car dealership to but a car, but all the cars are hidden in the back lot. you first have to do a google search for the car you think you may want in the salesman office, then you have to to fill out your loan application before even actually seeing or test driving them.

Fourth, there is also the question of whether or not to recruit Physicians and Nurses Practitioners separately from other staff, with their own devoted flow and application process. ( At an academic institution this would be standard) There is a bureaucratic advantage to treat every one the same, but then again, an average physician generated 1 million + dollars of revenue a year for 10 years, so should they be approached differently?

Anyway, I could drone on for a while, (( I have eek!! )) but regards how to approach online recruiting/staffing here is a reasonable approach.

1. Define clearly what makes you unique, particularly from any other, closely located, high quality institutions ( hint – its not your 401k…)

2.Take a hard look at the flow of your webpage first. Does it show your uniqueness? Is it designed for the applicant, or is it designed for your IT Department? Is there a very clear call to action – (ie call us, send a resume, fill out a profile). Do you use embedded videos( these are golden because they SHOW culture. How friendly is your jobs search engine ( yours is pretty good)

3. Do you have dedicated Twitter account for jobs or careers? Twitter is light weight, its friendly for reposting and scheduling, its quite visual for location, and, in theory a Twitter widget could be placed on your recruiting page making your recruiting page quite dynamic.

4.If you have a LinkedIn site, is it current and showing all of your openings ( most aren’t) and are you taking advantage of its video options ( most don’t). Does it clearly lead an applicant you your website.

5.Other than a link, I wouldn’t spend too much time On Facebook at least for directly recruiting or recruiting physicians or NPs, but I do think it is a great place to generally show culture. When we are in job search mode, we will go to website first.

Take a look Kiaser Permenante (https://www.kaiserpermanentejobs.org/?kp_shortcut_referrer=kp.org/careers) which I think does a good job.

At Tufts you have is a very nice introductory video on the webpage with over a thousand views, and your openings are easy to find, but have you made enough of a sale to get someone to fill out an application? What about the location? Where do people live? It would be interesting to track page visits, video views and daily applications to get a sense of page effectiveness. (Taker a look at Google Careers to see how they use video https://careers.google.com) . How about a several inexpensive 'Day in the life' videos? A graph showing gender diversity? A map showing where employees live? Anything special, such as your relationship to the university?

Jump to this post

Thanks for this Matt. One of my new projects is working with recruitment on how we can best position ourselves on-line to attract great candidates. Hartford HealthCare may be the exception in that we also control the LinkedIn channels for all of our entities, but have it in partnership with recruitment. We're working to see how best to maximize that.

Since I'm seeking a project from my Mayo Social Media Bronze, this might be a perfectly positioned project.

REPLY
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