MCSMN Blog

September 10, 2019

Social Media and U.S. News Physician Reputation Scores

By Lee Aase, Director, Mayo Clinic Social Media Network

With the rise of health care consumerism, hospital rankings are increasingly important in patients' decisions of where to receive care.

Most prominent of these is the U.S. News & World Report Hospital Rankings & Ratings, which has been running for 30 years and includes rankings in 16 specialties as well as a national Honor Roll and a Best Regional Hospitals.

While many of the factors in the U.S. News rankings are objective data points related to quality such as mortality and hospital readmissions, a hospital's reputation among physicians plays a role in all of the specialties, and for four specialties it is 100 percent of the score.

U.S. News formerly gauged physician reputation through a mail-in survey sent to a few hundred board-certified physicians in each specialty. For the last several years, however, it has engaged Doximity, the social network limited to physicians and related professionals, to survey its broader base of members.

Greg Matthews, one of our External Advisory Board members, has studied a broad range of factors to identify any that correlate with these physician reputation scores. Interestingly for those of us who intuitively sense that social media engagement by the hospital and its physicians could play a strong role, he found that it was the most important metric of any of the factors he studied.

Greg and I are in Nashville this morning to present these findings, as well as our Mayo Clinic story of engaging physician staff in social media, and what became the Mayo Clinic Social Media Network (#MCSMN), at the Society for Healthcare Strategy & Market Development annual conference.

We discuss our presentation in his podcast, so I'd encourage you to listen and take a look at our slides as well.

If you have questions about the data, I know Greg will be glad to chime in with answers. Just pose those questions in the comments.

If you haven't yet signed up for your free Basic membership in #MCSMN, I hope you'll do it now. Be sure to use your work email address, because if your organization is a Corporate member you will automatically be upgraded to the same level of access our Mayo Clinic staff enjoy.

Check out our membership options, as well as our upcoming annual conference.

Choose a message to share 
Familiar with Doximity? If not, you really should be. Here's why: #Doximity #SocialMedia #MCSMN
What exactly goes into physician and hospital rankings, and why does it matter? #SocialMedia #MayoClinic #Doximity
Signed up for your free Basic #MCSMN membership yet? If not, you really, really should. #MCSMN #MayoClinic


Tags: Physician Involvement

I reviewed your slides and listened to your podcast. It will take me some time to digest and think about what to do with is, but it dovetails into my belief that we need better understand the relationship between digital networks and real world engagement as you did here.

I understand the causation/causality discussion-, despite this one thing that struck me as interesting was physician tweeting>gender diversity>size, age. Why? Because in the short term, it’s much easier(and cheaper) to modify physician tweeting behavior than the others.

Anyway, great stuff! I may have some fu questions and this is one I may need to share directly with several senior managers I know.

COMMENT

Thanks, @matthewrehrl. @gmatthews did the research and would be able to address the questions, but for my part it was nice validation that our work to get more staff engaged in social media appears to have some benefit in the US News reputation scores.

COMMENT
@matthewrehrl

I reviewed your slides and listened to your podcast. It will take me some time to digest and think about what to do with is, but it dovetails into my belief that we need better understand the relationship between digital networks and real world engagement as you did here.

I understand the causation/causality discussion-, despite this one thing that struck me as interesting was physician tweeting>gender diversity>size, age. Why? Because in the short term, it’s much easier(and cheaper) to modify physician tweeting behavior than the others.

Anyway, great stuff! I may have some fu questions and this is one I may need to share directly with several senior managers I know.

Jump to this post

Thanks, @matthewrehrl! Great commentary. And you caught my thinking … it takes a lot longer to change the size or gender mix of your organization; it takes a lot less to enable and amplify online clinicians. I’d welcome any questions you might have here or via email (greg@healthquant.health). And you might get some value from the full report – it gives a lot of context we just couldn’t squeeze in to the deck. It’s here: https://app.box.com/s/rgwqfesu31m6usiasoz8ai2rl3vrs2ic

COMMENT
Please login or register to post a reply.

© Mayo Clinic Social Media Network. All Rights Reserved.