MCSMN Blog

April 16, 2019

Build Community and Trust with Facebook Watch Parties

By Audrey Laine Seymour, Senior Communications Specialist

A Facebook Watch Party is a showing of curated videos gathered into one post, on which viewers comment in real-time, much like a Facebook Live broadcast. Facebook first launched Watch Party to Groups in July 2018 and then all Pages and people in November. Mayo Clinic has hosted two Watch Parties, which featured video content for health awareness months: American Heart Month and Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

Our first Watch Party was hosted on February 26. There were 1,274 engagements, including 268 comments and 13 shares. We shared over 20 heart-related videos that had been uploaded to our Page in February. When you create a Watch Party queue, you're not uploading new videos, but selecting previously uploaded or live videos from your Page and others. Facebook Live Video Q&As were in our Watch Party queue, which may be why viewers began to post questions and expected immediate responses.

Our second Watch Party was on March 6, the day before we joined other members of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable to kick off the #80inEveryCommunity campaign. Again, we selected videos previously uploaded to the Mayo Clinic Facebook Page. This time, there were 44 videos, which included short, 30-second videos we shared last year. There were 856 engagements, including 180 comments and 8 shares.

We asked Dr. Paul Limburg to join us for the Watch Party so that he could answer questions as they came in. In a pinned comment, we asked the audience to post their colorectal cancer questions for Dr. Limburg.

The Watch Party audience members interacted with one another in addition to posting questions. Many of them found others who shared a difficult situation. As each video played, it was easy to see the community building as viewers shared personal information and tagged others to bring them into the conversation. Dr. Limburg answered each question and I found supporting content for many of his responses. It's imperative to reply to questions timely and with more than just a link in order to build trust in your brand. Dr. Limburg and other experts who contribute to our team's work understand that their answers have the potential to reach thousands of people, and the power to solidify trust that will influence patients' health care decisions.

Here's how you can create a Watch Party from your Page.

There are a few limitations you should be aware of:

  1. The Page admin who starts the Watch Party must stay in the Watch Party for its duration. If you close your browser, log out, or put your computer or laptop to sleep, the Watch Party will end.
  2. Once the last video in your Watch Party queue ends, you are responsible for ending the Watch Party. Otherwise, your audience sees a black screen.
  3. The option to reply to comments was not available on my desktop view during the Watch Party. This is why Dr. Limburg's answers were posted as new comments, tagging the viewer who posted the question. I did, however, have the option to reply to comments in the Pages app.
  4. Watch Party recaps are saved as a post. Unlike other posts, these posts are not embeddable, which is why our two Watch Parties aren't embedded on this page. 🙂

Choose a message to share 
Build community and trust with Facebook watch parties #Facebook #MayoClinic #FacebookWatch
How you can create a Watch Party from your Facebook Page: #FacebookWatch
What are Facebook Watch Parties, and how can you use them to build a community of followers? #MayoClinic #MCSMN


Tags: #WatchParty, Case Studies, Facebook, Uncategorized

One thing I like to point out to other healthcare organizations about the Mayo Clinic is you experiment and use social media to go directly after your health mission, rather than simply using SM for branding purposes. For example, in this case you were going after your #80inEveryCommunity campaign, a measurable health outcome-focused problem.

One question for the people who put this together: was it directly pointed out the the marketing team before they started that this effort could potentially prevent x number of colorectal cancers? In other words, do the social media folks see themselves as people who can directly save lives? (They should).

COMMENT
@matthewrehrl

One thing I like to point out to other healthcare organizations about the Mayo Clinic is you experiment and use social media to go directly after your health mission, rather than simply using SM for branding purposes. For example, in this case you were going after your #80inEveryCommunity campaign, a measurable health outcome-focused problem.

One question for the people who put this together: was it directly pointed out the the marketing team before they started that this effort could potentially prevent x number of colorectal cancers? In other words, do the social media folks see themselves as people who can directly save lives? (They should).

Jump to this post

Thanks for pointing that out, Matthew. I do see myself as someone who can directly save lives. In fact, that's why I chose this industry. I wanted to be a pharmacist and after working at a hometown pharmacy for three years (before the spotlight on the opioid crisis), I saw how the entire system was being abused. I wanted to be a pharmacist to help people. My back-up route was marketing, which has always intrigued me. I got my BBA in Marketing and it was in college I learned about the world of healthcare marketing and that I could still help people make the best decisions for their care. I went on to earn my MBA while working full-time and was able to use many real-life scenarios in my class discussions. I love my job because I'm able to (#1) help people while (#2) marketing the top hospital in the U.S. 🙂

COMMENT

Thanks Audrey. There's a chance I may be using the #80inEveryCommunity to advocate for a cross-organizational Statewide group to coordinate Social Media content on select health problems ( I call it SMASH: Social Media Action for Statewide Health).

We have a fairly strong network of Healthcare CEOs who personally know each other, but the Social Media and Website Gatekeepers don't. I content that digital networks are greatly strengthened by personal, physical connections, and if the organizational Gatekeepers can physically meet quarterly, they can periodically leverage their own idiosyncratic individual digital networks around specific statewide problems (Cancer, Opioids, Vaccinations, Trauma Prevention ) towards something measurable.

A simple, measurable, example. Minimizing distracted driving deaths in teenagers by spreading and coordinating a < 1 minute video on how to turn on the distracted driving function of iPhones and Android phones….

COMMENT
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